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Star Empires

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Colonies and Empires

In a sci-fi campaign, heroes trek from planet to planet and through the deep ocean of space, meeting strange aliens and new civilizations or the ruins of societies long passed into dust. For some, the urge to explore and seek their fortune is reward enough, but other heroes are not content merely to wander. They want to leave their mark on the universe, to plant their own flag and become power players on the interplanetary scene. They may find an unclaimed asteroid and set up their own home base, seize the lair of a deadly space monster they have slain to open the way to opportunity, broker trade deals that give them control of spaceports and trading posts, or even wage a war of conquest to claim a world of their own. However they stake their claim, these heroes open the way for settlers to proliferate in their domain, building a base of power and wealth that goes far beyond the reach of their blasters as they move from colony to empire!

The rules here focus on the rules for building an empire and, when necessary, waging war to protect or expand it. They incorporate both city planning at the local colony level and larger scale decisions that affect the whole empire, as well as military strategy and tactics, all operating at a macro-level rather than managing the microdetails of the daily lives of settlers and soldiers. This book uses “empire” as a universal term to represent all kinds of domains, regardless of size, form of government, and gender of the ruler. Most of the decisions are in the hands of the players, and these rules are written with that assumption, using terms like “your empire” and “your army.” However, the GM is still in charge of the campaign, and is expected to make judgments about the repercussions of player decisions.

While players running an empire should be allowed to read these rules (having them do so makes much of the empire building easier for the GM), the players shouldn’t think they can abuse these rules to exploit weird corner cases. For example, players may decide to construct a city full of graveyards because of the bonuses they provide to the city, but if the GM believes that is unreasonable, he could decide that the city is prone to frequent undead attacks.

Likewise, a settlement with more magic shops than houses and businesses may slowly become a ghost town as all the normal citizens move elsewhere out of superstitious fear. As with a normal campaign, the GM is the final arbiter of the rules, and can make adjustments to events as necessary for the campaign.

Empire Terminology

In order to account for the possible scales which Empire-building may operate at, four terms will be utilized to categorize area: Sectors, Modules, Districts, and Colonies.

A Sector is a significant area, which may be a measure of land, a continent, a planet, or perhaps even a system of planets and moons. At its smallest, a Sector should be a hexagonal plot with a 12-mile diameter (with an area of about 94 square miles).

A District represents a region, neighborhood, suburb, or similar subdivision of a sector which performs certain tasks or functions. A single Sector can contain up to 100 Districts.

A Colony is a residence of creatures, which may vary in size from a small village to an immense metropolis to an entire country or globe-spanning city. A Colony must contain at least one District. A Colony can include multiple Districts, but its Consumption increases by an additional 1 BP for every District beyond the first.

A Module represents the smallest amount of space necessary to carry out a specific enterprise while still having it affect society on the level necessary to alter its function. For a small village or province, a Module may be a simple home or stable. For a galactic empire, a Module will likely constitute a city or even a specialized planetoid.

A District contains a total of 36 Modules, and most forms of Infrastructure require at least one Module.

A Turn represents an amount of time needed to enact major change in an Empire. Generally, this time is equal to 1 month. You make your Empire checks and other decisions about running your Empire at the end of each Turn.

A Moment represents a smaller increment of a Turn, and in smallest scale is equivalent to 1 day. In large-scale games, a Moment may even be a month or year. A Turn generally possesses 30 moments.

Each of these terms is necessarily abstract, because the scale of a sci-fi campaign universe is incredibly variable. In some campaigns, most or all of the action may occur on a single planet and its moons. In others, whole star systems may be simple waypoints along the journey through the stars. Further, while the number of planetoids across the tapestry of space is innumerable, those that are habitable, useful, and interesting is far smaller. Using abstract measurements allows you to tailor the base rules to the scale of your particular campaign universe without worrying about how to rewrite or adjust things after the fact to adapt them.

It is important that the scales of these measurements be kept consistent across a campaign, and so it should be decided prior to the game how much territory these Modules should represent. Only as a result of drastic changes in scale (such as the players moving from controlling a planet to controlling an entire solar system) should the amount of territory classified as a “Sector” ever be altered.

Empire Building

Every Empire has four fundamental statistics which represent its overall functionality: Economy, Loyalty, Stability, and Unrest.

Economy-Economy represents the Empire’s capacity to produce or otherwise obtain various resources such as food and equipment. A high Economy modifier translates to an ability to provide for the Empire’s Consumption.

Loyalty-Loyalty represents the willingness of the Empire to cooperate with its Leaders and to obey its laws. It also conveys the Empire’s overall sense of patriotism and acceptance of its Leadership. A high Loyalty modifier means that the Empire is willing to work with whatever ideas the PCs offer.

Stability-Stability represents the physical and social well-being of an Empire as well as its capacity to persist over time. A high Stability modifier means that the Empire is overall functional and is likely to remain functional in its present state.

Unrest-Unrest indicates how rebellious your citizens are. Your Empire’s initial Unrest is 0. Unrest can never fall below 0 (anything that would modify it to less than 0 is wasted). Subtract your Empire’s Unrest from all Economy, Loyalty, and Stability checks. If your Empire’s Unrest is 11 or higher, the Empire begins to lose control of Sectors it has claimed. If your Empire’s Unrest ever reaches 20, the Empire falls into collapse (see Upkeep Phase) Economy checks, Loyalty checks, and Stability checks are made against the Empire’s Control DC.

The check is made by rolling a d20 and adding the respective fundamental statistic. Other key statistics and rules for dealing with your Empire include the following:

Build Points (BP) are the measure of your Empire’s resources—equipment, labor, money, and so on. They’re used to acquire new Sectors and develop additional Infrastructure, Colonies, and terrain improvements. Your Empire also consumes BP to maintain itself (see Consumption). BP do not represent a pile of money sitting in a vault or a credit account nor any tangible quantity of liquid wealth; instead, they represent the totality of your Empire’s productive economic activity generated by the actions of all of your citizens.

Consumption indicates how many BP are required to keep the Empire functioning each Turn. Consumption is equal to the Empire’s size in Sectors, modified by any Infrastructure or terrain which alters Consumption. Consumption can never go below 0.

Control DC represents the difficulty of a give Empire action or situation. Some events occur without need for a check, while others require a Control check to succeed. The base DC for a Control check is equal to 20 + the Empire’s Size in Sectors + the total number of Districts in all your Colonies + any other modifiers from special circumstances or effects. Unless otherwise stated, the DC of an Empire check is the Control DC.

Population is an abstract statistic that does not directly affect any of your Empire’s statistics, but it can be fun to keep track of anyway.

Size represents how many Sectors the Empire claims. A new Empire’s Size is 1.

Treasury is the amount of BP your Empire can access in order to use for its activities (much in the same way that your character uses credits to purchase gear). Your Treasury can fall below 0 (meaning your Empire’s costs exceed its savings and it is operating in debt), but this increases Unrest (see Upkeep Phase).

Founding An Empire

Every Empire begins with at least one Colony, which is built using Build Points (see Build Points, Colonies and Infrastructure). Once this initial Colony is founded, decisions can be made about the Empire that affect its statistics. Such decisions are as follows.

Choose Your Ethos: Your Empire’s ethos reflects the mentality of the citizens and government and has certain effects upon the Empire’s statistics.

These modifiers apply to the Empire overall, and up to three in total can be applied. However, an Empire cannot have two traits which oppose each other, as the mentalities are fundamentally incompatible. If an Empire has fewer than three traits, it gains a +2 bonus to Stability for every trait slot it left open.

A Leader can change an Empire’s Ethos during the Edict Phase, although Unrest increases by 1 for every trait that is added, removed, or changed.

Table 1-1: Ethos
Trait Modifier Opposing Trait
Authoritarian +2 Loyalty Libertarian
Collectivist +2 Loyalty Individualist
Individualist +2 Economy Collectivist
Libertarian +2 Economy Authoritarian
Materialist +2 Economy Spiritualist
Militarist +2 Economy Pacifist
Pacifist +2 Loyalty Militarist
Spiritualist +2 Loyalty Materialist
Xenophobic +2 Loyalty Xenophilic
Xenophilic +2 Economy Xenophobic

Assign Leadership Roles: Create Leadership Roles and assign the roles to PCs and NPCs involved in running the Empire, such as Ruler, General, and High Priest. The Leadership roles provide bonuses on checks made to collect taxes, deal with rebellious citizens, and resolve similar issues.

Start Treasury: The Build Points you have left over from starting your first Colony make up your initial Treasury.

Determine Initial Attributes: Your initial Economy, Loyalty, and Stability scores are based on the Empire’s Ethos and the Infrastructure your Colony has. (If you start with more than one Colony, include all of the Colonies in this calculation.)

Assign Capital: An Empire should have a capital— the seat of your power. Your first Colony (or one that you begin your Empire with) is your Capital. If you want to designate a different Colony as the Capital, you may do so in Step 6 of the Edict Phase. Your Capital primarily comes into play if your Empire loses Sectors. If you change the Capital, attempt a Stability check. Success means Unrest increases by 1; failure means Unrest increases by 1d6.

Leadership Roles

Most Empires have Leaders that fill different Roles— tending to the economy, defense, and health of citizens. PCs and NPCs can fill these Roles; your soldier may be the Empire’s Warden, the technomancer its High Priest, and so on. Each Role grants the Empire different benefits.

A character can only fill one Leadership Role at a time. For example, your character can’t be both the Ruler and the High Priest. Even if you want the Ruler to be the head of the Empire’s religion, she’s too busy ruling to also do the work of a High Priest; she’ll have to appoint someone else to do that work.

Each position offers a bonus in addition to a Vacancy penalty. You can choose to have the position not exist in the Empire. If you do, the Empire never suffers Vacancy penalties for the position, but no individual can take that position. Creating or eliminating a position increases unrest by 2.

Multiple people can share a position, with each person adding their modifier wherever it may go.

However, if an Empire check failure made by a shared position occurs, unrest increases by 1 for every individual beyond the first operating in that position.

So long as at least one person is in the position, then the position does not suffer a Vacancy penalty.

These Leadership Roles can be a part of any form of government; in some Empires they take the form of a formal ruling council, while in others they may be advisers, ministers, relatives of the Leader, or simply powerful nobles, merchants, or bureaucrats with access to the seat of power. The names of these roles are game terms and need not correspond to the titles of those roles in the Empire—the Ruler of your Empire may be called king, queen, emperor, first comrade, chosen one, dictator, hierarch, shogun, padishah, overlord, sultan, and so on.

Responsibilities of Leadership: In order to gain the benefits of Leadership, you must spend at least 10 Moments per Turn attending to your duties; these Moments do not need to be consecutive.

They can be roleplayed or can be assumed to run in the background without needing to be defined or actively played out. Time spent ruling cannot be used for adventuring, crafting magic items, or completing other downtime activities that require your full attention and participation. Failure to complete your duties during a Turn means treating the Role as though it’s vacant.

For most campaigns, it’s best to have the PCs pick the same Moments of the Turn for these administrative duties, so that everyone is available for adventuring at the same time.

PCs and NPCs as Leaders: These rules include enough important Leadership Roles that a small group of PCs can’t fill them all. You may have to recruit NPCs to fill out the remaining necessary Roles for your Empire. Cohorts, followers, and even intelligent familiars or similar companions can fill Leadership roles, and you may want to consider inviting allied NPCs to become leaders, such as asking a friendly NPC you rescued to become the Empire’s Marshal.

Abdicating a Role: If you want to step down from a Leadership position, you must find a replacement to avoid incurring the associated Vacancy penalty for your position. Abdicating a position increases Unrest by 1 and requires a Loyalty check; if the check fails, the Vacancy Penalty applies for 1 Turn while the new Leader transitions into that Role. If you are the Ruler, abdicating increases Unrest by 2 instead of 1, and you take a –4 penalty on the Loyalty check to avoid the Vacancy penalty.

If you are leaving one Leadership Role to take a different one in the Empire, the Unrest increase does not occur and you gain a +4 bonus on the Loyalty check to avoid the Vacancy penalty.

Leader Statistics

The statistics for the different Roles are presented as follows.

Benefit(s): This explains the benefit to your Empire if you have a character in this Role, generally adding the character’s Ruler Bonus (RB) to certain kinds of Empire checks.

Rulership Bonus (RB): A character’s RB is not a universal statistic, but instead represents their overall suitability for the role they occupy. A character who changes roles may have a different RB in their new role than in their former position. Any character has a base RB of 0, which increases by +1 for each of the following that applies:

  • +1 for every 6 character levels (maximum +3)
  • +1 for every 5 ranks the character has in their role’s relevant skill
  • +1 for having Skill Focus or Skill Synergy in their role’s relevant skill
  • +1 if the character has an ability score modifier of +3 or greater in their role’s relevant ability score(s); this stacks if the role has more than one relevant ability score and this requirement is met for each Most benefits are constant and last as long as there is a character in that Role, but don’t stack with themselves. For example, a Leader whose RB increases Loyalty by 2 provides a constant +2 to the Empire’s Loyalty (not a stacking +2 increase every Turn), which goes away if she dies or resigns.

If a benefit mentions a particular Phase in Empire building, that benefit applies every Turn during that Phase. For example, the Enforcer decreases Unrest by 1 at every Upkeep Phase.

Vacancy Penalty: This line explains the penalty to your Empire if no character fills this Role, or if the Leader fails to spend the necessary time fulfilling his responsibilities. Some Roles have no Vacancy penalty.

If a character in a Role is killed or permanently incapacitated during a Turn and not restored to health by the start of the next Empire Turn, that Role counts as vacant for that next Turn, after which a replacement can be appointed to the Role.

Like benefits, most Vacancy penalties are constant, last as long as that Role is vacant, and don’t stack with themselves. If a vacant Role lists an increase to Unrest, however, that increase does not go away when the Role is filled. For example, if the Empire doesn’t have a Ruler for a Turn, Unrest increases by 4 and doesn’t automatically return to its previous level when you eventually fill the vacant Ruler Role.

Checks Made: Whenever a certain type of die roll is made in relation to the Empire, whomever is in this position is responsible for rolling. If the position is vacant or otherwise does not exist, someone else should be delegated to roll in their place.

Leader Positions

Ruler

The Ruler is the highest-ranking person in the Empire, performing its most important civic engagements and functions. The Ruler is responsible for the Empire’s overall function, presiding at least partially over every aspect of governance and diplomacy.

Benefit(s): Add your RB to Economy, Loyalty, and Stability.

Relevant Skill: Diplomacy

Relevant Abilities: Intelligence, Charisma

Vacancy Penalty: Unrest increases by 4 during the Empire’s Upkeep Phase.

Checks Made: Loyalty checks, any checks or Edicts not covered by other role

Ambassador

The Ambassador is in charge of the Empire’s foreign policy—how it interacts with other Empires and organizations.

Benefit(s): Add RB to Stability.

Relevant Skill: Diplomacy

Relevant Abilities: Intelligence, Charisma

Vacancy Penalty: Stability decreases by 2. The Empire cannot issue Diplomatic Edicts.

Checks Made: Empire checks or skill checks for diplomacy

Chief Justice

The Chief Justice is the head of legal affairs within the Empire, coordinating law enforcement and stopping criminals.

Benefit(s): Add RB to Loyalty. During the Upkeep Phase, you may decrease Unrest by 1; if you do so, you must succeed at a Loyalty check or Loyalty decreases by 1.

Relevant Skill: Sense Motive

Relevant Abilities: Wisdom, Dexterity

Vacancy Penalty: Unrest increases by 2

Checks Made: Loyalty checks to reduce Unrest or prevent Unrest increases. Checks to resolve events involving crime.

Chief Technologist

The Chief Technologist is an informer on science policy, an individual versed in at least one area of science who can apply their learning to better run the Empire.

Benefit(s): Add RB to your choice of Economy, Loyalty, or Stability

Relevant Skill: Computers, Engineering, Life Science, Medicine, or Physical Science (choose one)

Relevant Abilities: Intelligence, Wisdom

Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 2.

Checks Made: Empire event rolls

General

The General leads the Empire’s military affairs

Benefit(s): Add RB to Stability.

Relevant Skill: Intimidate

Relevant Abilities: Strength, Charisma

Vacancy Penalty: Loyalty decreases by 4.

Checks Made: Empire checks for Events requiring combat

Head of Security

The Head of Security is responsible for protecting the Leaders of the Empire, or otherwise retaining the security of the Empire.

Benefit(s): Add RB to Loyalty.

Relevant Skill: Intimidate

Relevant Abilities: Strength, Constitution

Vacancy Penalty: Loyalty and Stability decrease by 2.

Checks Made: Stability Checks

High Priest

The High Priest tends to the Empire’s religious needs and guides its growth. In more secular Empires, this position may be a cultural advisor or propaganda officer.

Benefit(s): Add RB to Stability.

Relevant Skill: Mysticism or Culture (choose one)

Relevant Abilities: Wisdom, Charisma

Vacancy Penalty: Stability and Loyalty decrease by 2. During the Upkeep Phase, Unrest increases by 1.

Checks Made: Holiday Edicts

Magister

The Magister guides the Empire’s higher learning in magical and extraplanar affairs.

Benefit(s): Add RB to Economy.

Relevant Skill: Mysticism

Relevant Abilities: Intelligence, Wisdom

Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 4.

Checks Made: Commission Edicts

Space Warden

The Space Warden protects the Empire’s borders in space and is in charge of monitoring and controlling interstellar commerce, normal space and hyperspace transportation, and defense against spaceborne threats.

Benefit(s): Add RB to Economy.

Relevant Skill: Survival

Relevant Abilities: Dexterity, Wisdom

Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 4. The Empire cannot make Exploration edicts.

Checks Made: Exploration Edicts

Speaker

The Speaker acts as a liaison between the citizenry and the Leadership, engaging with and pacifying the populace

Benefit(s): Add RB to Loyalty.

Relevant Skill: Bluff

Relevant Abilities: Charisma, Wisdom

Vacancy Penalty: Loyalty decreases by 2. The Empire gains no benefits from the Holiday Edict. During the Upkeep Phase, Unrest increases by 1.

Checks Made: Holiday Edicts

Spymaster

The Spymaster is in charge of espionage and other covert affairs within and without the Empire.

Benefit(s): During the Edict Phase, choose one Empire attribute (Economy, Loyalty or Stability). Add your RB to this attribute.

Relevant Skill: Sense Motive

Relevant Abilities: Dexterity, Intelligence

Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 4. During the Upkeep Phase, Unrest increases by 1.

Checks Made: Espionage Edicts

Treasurer

The Treasurer monitors the state of the Empire’s Treasury and economic affairs.

Benefit(s): Add RB to Economy.

Relevant Skill: Any one Profession skill

Relevant Abilities: Intelligence, Wisdom

Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 4. The Empire cannot collect taxes—during the Edict Phase, when you would normally collect taxes, the Empire does not collect taxes at all and the taxation level is considered “None.”

Checks Made: Economy checks, Taxation Edicts

Optional Roles

The following leadership roles are not strictly required as part of a leadership team but can be added to the leadership team to enhance what the ruling team can do or to manage an expanding empire.

Consort

A Consort is typically a spouse or foreign representative, someone who assists the Ruler and is often used as a major part of the Empire’s propaganda machine.

Benefit(s): Add one-half your RB to Loyalty.

If the Ruler is unavailable during a Turn, you may act as the Ruler for that Turn, negating the Vacancy penalty for having no Ruler, though you do not gain the Ruler benefit. If you act as the Ruler for the Turn, you must succeed at a Loyalty check during the Empire’s Upkeep Phase or Unrest increases by 1.

Relevant Skill: Culture

Relevant Abilities: Charisma, Wisdom

Vacancy Penalty: None.

Checks Made: As Ruler when Ruler is unavailable

Successor

The Successor is an individual designated to take over as Ruler should the Ruler perish or abdicate. Because the Successor carries the potential of being the next Ruler, the Successor’s Role is similar to the Consort in that the Successor may act on behalf of the Ruler. Unlike all other Roles, it is possible for the Successor to fill one additional Role besides that of Successor.

Benefit(s): Add one-half your RB to Loyalty.

You may act as the Ruler for a Turn, negating the Vacancy penalty for the Empire having no Ruler, though you do not gain the Ruler benefit. Whenever you act as the Ruler for the Turn, you must succeed at a Loyalty check during the Empire’s Upkeep Phase or Unrest increases by 1.

Relevant Skill: Culture

Relevant Abilities: Wisdom, Charisma

Vacancy Penalty: None.

Checks Made: As Ruler when Ruler is unavailable

Viceroy

The Viceroy represents the Empire’s interests in a subject colony or vassal state

Benefit(s): Add one-half your RB to Economy.

You may assume any Leadership Role (including Ruler) for your colony or vassal state, but any benefit you provide in this Role is 1 lower than normal; if you do so, you must spend 10 Moments that Turn performing duties appropriate to that Leadership Role in addition to the 10 Moments spent for Viceroy duties.

Vacancy Penalty: If you have no Viceroy for your vassal state, treat it as if it had the Ruler Vacancy penalty.

Build Points

The currency of an Empire’s wealth and productivity is Build Points (BP). Build Points are an abstraction representing the Empire’s assets, be they material, commercial, intellectual, or otherwise. Build Points represent the total productive output of your Empire, emerging from industry, Agriculture, or other economically generative activity that occurs within the Empire.

You spend BP on tasks necessary to develop and protect your Empire—growing food, creating roads, constructing Infrastructure, raising armies, and so on.

These things are made at your command, but they are not yours. The cities, roads, farms, and buildings belong to the citizens who build them and use them to live and work every day, and those acts of living and working create more BP for the Empire. As the orchestrators, you use your power and influence to direct the economic and constructive activity of your Empire, deciding what, when, and where things get built.

Build Points don’t have a precise exchange rate to currency because they don’t represent exact amounts of specific resources. For example, a mine, a research facility, and a factory all contribute to an Empire’s economy, but do so in diverse and difficult-to-compare ways.

Providing a seed amount of BP at the start of Empire building means that the Empire isn’t starving for resources in the initial Turns. Whether you acquire these funds on your own or with the help of an influential NPC is decided by the GM and sets the tone for much of the campaign. 50 BP is advisable for a starting Empire

Empire Turn Sequence

An Empire’s growth occurs during four phases, which together make up 1 Empire Turn. The four phases are as follows:

Phase 1—Upkeep Phase

During the Upkeep Phase, you adjust your Empire’s scores based on what’s happened in the past Turn, how happy the people are, how much they’ve consumed and are taxed, and so on. If your Empire controls 0 Sectors, skip the Upkeep Phase and proceed to the Edict Phase.

Step 1—Determine Empire Stability: Attempt a Stability check. If you succeed, Unrest decreases by 1 (if this would reduce Unrest below 0, add 1 BP to your Treasury instead). If you fail by less than 5, Unrest increases by 1; if you fail by 5 or more, Unrest increases by 1d4.

Step 2—Pay Consumption: Subtract your Empire’s Consumption from the Empire’s Treasury. If your Treasury is negative after paying Consumption, Unrest increases by 2.

Step 3—Modify Unrest: Unrest increases by 1 for each Empire attribute (Economy, Loyalty, or Stability) that is a negative number. The Enforcer may attempt to reduce Unrest during this step. If the Empire’s Unrest is 11 or higher, it loses 1 Sector (the Leaders choose which Sector). See Losing Sectors.

If your Empire’s Unrest ever reaches 20, the Empire falls into collapse. While in collapse, your Empire can take no action and treats all Economy, Loyalty, and Stability check results as 0. Restoring order once an Empire falls into collapse typically requires a number of quests and lengthy adventures by you and the other would-be Leaders to restore the people’s faith in you.

Example: Soren is the Ruler of an Empire with a Size of 30 and a Control DC of 60. Based on Leadership Role bonuses, Empire alignment bonuses, and Infrastructure in its Colonies, the Empire’s Economy is 52, its Loyalty is 45, and its Stability is 56. Its Unrest is currently 5, its Consumption is 5, and the Treasury has 12 BP. In Step 1 of the Upkeep Phase, Tom, the Warden, attempts a Stability check to determine the Empire’s stability. Tom rolls a 19, adds the Empire’s Stability (56), and subtracts its Unrest (5), for a total of 70; that’s a success, so Unrest decreases by 1. In Step 2, the Empire pays 5 BP for Consumption. In Step 3, none of the attributes are negative, so Unrest doesn’t increase. Kristen, the Enforcer, doesn’t want to risk reducing the Empire’s Loyalty, so she doesn’t use her Leadership Role to reduce Unrest. At the end of this Phase, the Empire has Economy 52, Loyalty 45, Stability 56, Unrest 4, Consumption 5, and Treasury 7 BP.

Phase 2—Edict Phase

The Edict Phase is when you make proclamations on expansion, improvements, taxation, holidays, and so on. Edicts reflect diplomacy, leadership, and other Empire-wide decisions.

Step 1—Assign Leadership: Assign PCs or NPCs to any vacant Leadership Roles or change the Roles being filled by particular PCs or closely allied NPCs (see Leadership Roles).

Steps 2 & 3—Claim and Abandon Sectors: For your Empire to grow, you must claim additional Sectors. You can only claim a Sector that is adjacent to at least 1 other Sector in your Empire. Before you can claim it, the Sector must first be explored, then cleared of monsters and dangerous hazards (see Founding a Colony for more details). Then, to claim the Sector, spend 1 BP; this establishes the Sector as part of your Empire and increases your Empire’s Size by 1. Table 2-3: Improvement Edicts tells you the maximum number of Sectors you can claim per Turn.

You may abandon any number of Sectors to reduce your Empire’s Size (which you may wish to do to manage Consumption). Doing so increases Unrest by 1 for each Sector abandoned (or by 4 if the Sector contained a Colony). This otherwise functions like losing a Sector due to unrest (see Step 3 of the Upkeep Phase).

Step 4—Create and Improve Infrastructure and Colonies: You may prepare a Sector for constructing a Colony. Depending on the site, this may involve clearing forests or rubble, digging sanitation trenches, installing plumbing and power conduits, and so on. See the Preparation Cost column in Terrain to determine how many BP this requires.

Table 2-3: Improvement Edicts tells you the maximum amount of Infrastructure you can make per Turn.

You may create a Colony in a claimed Sector (see Founding a Colony). Table 2-3: Improvement Edicts tells you the maximum number of Colonies you can establish per Turn.

You may build Infrastructure in any Colony in your Empire. When Infrastructure is completed, apply its modifiers to your Empire sheet. Table 2-3: Improvement Edicts tells you the maximum amount of Infrastructure you can construct in your Empire per Turn. The first House, Mansion, Noble Villa, or Tenement your Empire builds each Turn does not count against that limit.

Step 5—Issue Edicts Select or adjust your Edict levels (see Edicts)

Example: Soren’s Empire has no vacant Leadership Roles, so nothing happens in Step 1. The Leaders don’t want to spend BP and increase Size right now, so in Step 2 they don’t claim any Sectors. At the same time, they don’t want to abandon any Sectors, so they don’t do anything in Step 3. In Step 4, the Leaders construct a Level 1 Farm in one of the Empire’s prepared Colonies. In Step 5, the Leaders issue a Holiday Edict of one Empireal holiday (Loyalty +1, Consumption +1). Looking ahead to the Income Phase, Soren realizes that an average roll for his Economy check would be a failure (10 on the 1d20 + 52 Economy – 4 Unrest = 58, less than the Control DC of 60), which means there’s a good chance the Empire won’t generate any BP this Turn. He decides to set the Taxation Edict to “Minimal” (Economy +2, Loyalty +2). This means that while Soren’s Empire will generate less BP from a successful economy check, he is less likely to fail the economy check. At the end of this Phase, the Empire has Economy 54, Loyalty 48, Stability 55, Unrest 4, Consumption 4, and Treasury 5 BP.

Phase 3—Income Phase

During the Income Phase, you may add to or withdraw from the Treasury as well as collect taxes.

You may add to your Treasury by collecting more than you spend, you can spend credits from your personal wealth to add BP to your empire, and you also can attempt to convert BP into credits and withdraw them for your personal use.

Step 1—Make Deposits to the Treasury: You can add funds to an Empire’s Treasury by donating your personal wealth to the Empire—credits, valuables, equipment, magic items, and other valuables you find while adventuring. For every full 4,000 CP in value of the deposit, increase your Empire’s BP by 1.

Step 2—Collect Taxes: Attempt an Economy check, divide the result by a value based upon taxation level (see Taxation Edicts) (round down), and add a number of BP to your Treasury equal to the result.

Example: Soren and the other Leaders need BP in the Empire for future plans, so they deposit 8,000 CP worth of equipment (Treasury +2 BP). In Step 2, Harper, the Treasurer, rolls the Economy check to collect taxes using the “Minimal” taxes Soren imposed in the previous Phase. Harper rolls a 10 on the 1d20, adds the Empire’s Economy score (54), and subtracts Unrest (4) for a total of 60. The taxation level is minimal, which means the Empire adds 12 BP (the Economy check result of 60, divided by 5) to the Treasury. At the end of this Phase, the Empire has Economy 54, Loyalty 48, Stability 55, Unrest 4, Consumption 4, and Treasury 19 BP.

Phase 4—Event Phase

Check whether any unusual Events occur that require attention. Some are beneficial, such as an economic boom, good weather, or a scientific discovery. Others are detrimental, such as foul weather, a plague, or a rampaging monster.

In the Event Phase, a random Event may affect your Empire as a whole or a single Colony or Sector.

There is a 25% chance of an Event occurring (see Events). If no Event occurred during the last Turn, this chance increases to 75%. Some Events can be negated, ended, or compensated for with some kind of Empire check. Others, such as a rampaging monster, require you to complete an adventure or deal with a problem in a way not covered by the Empire-building rules.

In addition, the GM may have an adventure- or campaign-specific Event take place. Other Events may also happen during this Phase, such as independence or unification.

Example: The GM rolls on one of the Event tables and determines that a creature is attacking one of the Empire’s Sectors. Instead of attempting a Stability check to deal with the attacker (risking increasing Unrest if it fails), Soren and the other Leaders go on a quest to deal with the attacker personally. They defeat the monster, so the Event does not generate any Unrest. At the end of this Phase, the Empire’s scores are unchanged: Economy 54, Loyalty 48, Stability 55, Unrest 4, Consumption 4, and Treasury 19 BP.

These phases are always undertaken in the above order. Many steps allow you to perform an action once per Empire Turn; this means once for the entire Empire, not once per Leader.

Edicts

Edicts are the official pronouncements by your government about how you are running the Empire that Turn. For example, you may decide to raise or lower taxes, to have more or fewer holidays, and how much effort to put into improving the Empire’s Infrastructure. Edicts fall into six types: Armament, Expansion, Holiday, Improvement, Recruitment, and Taxation. In the Edict Phase of the Empire Turn, you may set the Holiday, Expansion, and Taxation Edict categories to whatever level you want, as well as decide how much of your allowed improvement from the Improvement Edict you’ll use and how much recruitment from the Recruitment Edict you’ll use. For example, you may decide that this Turn holidays are frequent, taxation is minimal, and you won’t build any improvements.

Table 2-1: Expansion Edicts
Attitude Sector Claims Stability Loyalty Economy Consumption
Isolationist -1 +2 +1 -2 -1 BP
Cautious +1 -1
Standard
Aggressive +1 -1 -1 +1 +1d4 BP
Imperialist +2 -2 -2 +2 +2d4 BP

Armament Edicts

Armament Edicts are used to obtain powerful equipment for the Empire’s armies, either in the form of large quantities of armor and weaponry or in the form of a fleet of ships. When issuing an armament Edict, choose a Colony. Over the course of the Turn, the Colony’s industry dedicates itself to the production of either a fleet of ships or a panoply of army equipment.

One armament Edict can be made per Colony per Turn. An Empire can issue armament Edicts to as many Colonies as they control but must pay an increasing number of additional BP for each Edict beyond the first (e.g. 2 additional BP for the second Edict, 3 additional BP for the third Edict, and so on).

When creating a fleet of ships, a Colony may create any number of ships of any level so long as the combined levels of the created ships do not exceed the Colony’s Supply Score (see the Colonies section for more rules on such scores). The total BP cost of creating ships is equal to twice the combined level of all of the ships created.

When creating army equipment, a Colony may produce any variety and amount of equipment, so long as the total combined BP cost of all of the equipment does not exceed the Colony’s Supply Score (see Equipping an Army). As part of issuing this Edict, the Empire may automatically equip any of its armies with equipment created as part of this Edict.

Multiple Colonies can work together to fulfill an armament Edict, adding together their Supply Scores to determine the max level of ships they can craft or the max BP cost of equipment they can create. A separate armament Edict must still be made for each Colony.

Expansion Edicts

Expansion Edicts are Events and actions the Empire uses to attract new citizens and increase the well-being of the Empire, such as recruitment campaigns, advertisements about services and goods, and propaganda – either to improve the perception of your Empire at home and abroad for expanding Empires, or to focus on stability and protectionism for insular Empires.

Holiday Edicts

Holidays are general celebrations or observances that take place across the Empire. The BP expenditure includes lost revenue from citizens not working during the holidays, preparations and logistical arrangements, and the cost of the actual celebrations. If the Empire’s Leaders reduce the amount of holidays they fund or fail to deliver on a certain number of holidays, unrest increases by 1 for each step by which holiday funding is reduced.

Example: Soren is the Ruler of an Empire with some Loyalty issues. He issues a Holiday Edict that there will be constant Empire-wide official holidays for the next Turn (Loyalty +4, Economy +2). In the second Turn, he worries about the increased Consumption’s effect on the Treasury, so he issues a new Holiday Edict decreeing that until further notice, there will be no Empire-wide holidays. He loses the previous +4 Loyalty bonus and incurs a —4 Loyalty penalty for the new Holiday Edict, but no longer has to pay the 1d12 Consumption each Turn for his previous Edict.

Table 2-2: Holiday Edicts
Frequency Consumption Economy Loyalty
None -2 -4
Rare 1 BP -1 -2
Regular +1d3 BP 0 0
Frequent +1d6 BP +1 +2
Constant +1d12 BP +2 +4

Improvement Edicts

Improvements are physical improvements you can make to your Empire: founding new Colonies, adding Infrastructure to a Colony and claiming more Sectors for your Empire. Your Empire’s Size limits how many improvements you can make each Turn; see the Improvement Edicts table below. You can make all of the improvements listed on the appropriate row of the table. For example, if your Empire’s Size is 5, on each Turn you can create 1 new Colony, 2 new pieces of Infrastructure, and claim 1 more Sector.

Table 2-3: Improvement Edicts
Empire Size New Colonies New Infrastructure Sector Claims
1-10 Sectors 1 2 1
11-25 Sectors 1 4 2
26-50 Sectors 1 9 3
51-100 Sectors 2 16 4
101-200 Sectors 3 25 8
201+ Sectors 4 Unlimited 12

Recruitment Edicts

The act of recruiting is integral to constructing an army but is expensive to carry out. When issuing a Recruitment Edict, choose one Colony, select the ACR (Army Challenge Rating) of the army you want to recruit (to a maximum of the Colony’s Capability score), and make a Loyalty check. On a success, you create an army of the ACR you specified (which can be of any size), paying an amount of BP equal to twice the ACR of the army you created. A failure means that no army is created and that the Empire loses BP equal to half the ACR of the army they tried to recruit, but that any Loyalty check made in that Colony next Turn is made with a +5 bonus.

Although you may create only one army, it can be comprised of any number of divisions (provided that you can recruit an army of the appropriate ACR).

One attempt at recruitment can be made per Colony per Turn. An Empire can attempt to recruit from as many Colonies as they control but must pay an increasing number of additional BP for each attempt beyond the first (e.g. 2 additional BP for the second attempt, 3 additional BP for the third attempt, and so on.) Armies recruited in this way can be of any size so long as the maximum ACR is observed. Armies need not be homogeneous in class or race, but any classes or races they are made up of must reside in the Colony (what variety of creatures and classes can be found in a Colony is determined by its Culture score. See Colonies for rules regarding the culture score).

In addition to conscripting its own citizens, an Empire can hire mercenary armies. Mercenary armies can be of any size, race, class, or ACR, and any attempt at recruiting them is automatically successful, but they cost twice as much as a normal army to maintain. In addition, the Empire takes a -1 penalty to Loyalty for each mercenary army the Empire employs. This penalty disappears when a mercenary army is destroyed or released from service. If a mercenary army is induced to desert or betray your Empire, your Empire gains 1 Unrest.

Taxation Edicts

Setting the tax level determines how much revenue you collect from taxes in the Income Phase. Higher taxes increase your Empire’s Economy (making it easier for you to succeed at Economy checks to generate revenue) but make your citizens unhappy (reducing Loyalty).

Table 2-4: Taxation Edicts
Taxation Level Revenue Economy Loyalty
Minimal Economy Check/5 +2 +2
Light Economy Check/4 +1 +1
Normal Economy Check/3
Heavy Economy Check/2.5 -2 -4
Crushing Economy Check/2 -4 -8

Losing Sectors

If you lose control of a Sector—whether because of Unrest, monster attacks, assaults from a hostile Empire, and so on—all Colonies in that Sector become free Colonies with no Loyalty to you or any other Empire (see Free Colony). At the GM’s discretion, monsters may move into the abandoned Sector, requiring you to clear it again if you want to claim it later.

Losing a Sector may break your connection to other Empire Sectors. For example, losing the only Sector that bridges two sides of a mountain range creates two separate territories. If this happens, the primary territory is the part of the Empire with your Capital and the rest of the Empire is the secondary territory. If none of the Empire’s Leaders are in the secondary territory when this split happens, you lose control of all Sectors (as described above) in the secondary territory.

If at least one Empire Leader is in the secondary territory when the split occurs, you retain control of the secondary territory, but Empire checks regarding its Sectors treat Unrest as 1 higher, increasing by 1 each Turn after the split. This modifier goes away if you claim a Sector that reconnects the secondary territory to the primary territory.

If you claim a Sector that re-establishes a connection to a leaderless secondary territory, you must succeed at a Stability check to reclaim each of your former Colonies in the secondary territory. You initially have a +5 bonus on these checks because the cities want to return to your Sector, but this bonus decreases by 1 (to a minimum bonus of +0) for each subsequent Turn since you lost control of the secondary territory.

If your Empire is reduced to 0 Sectors—whether through Unrest, a natural disaster, an attack by another Empire, or other circumstances—you are at risk of losing the Empire. On your next Turn, you must claim a new Sector and found or claim a new Colony, or your Empire is destroyed and you must start over if you want to found a new Empire. At the GM’s discretion, you may be able to keep some BP from your destroyed Empire’s Treasury for a time; otherwise, those assets are lost.

Colonies

The fundamental building blocks of your Empire are its Colonies. In a smaller scale, Colonies could start as simple settlements and grow over time into bustling cities. In larger scales, Colonies could move from threadbare interstellar colonies to planet-scaling metropolises.

Most Colonies only have 1 District but may contain more. You can create an additional District for that Colony by paying the preparation cost for the Colony’s terrain as listed in the Terrain tables.

Remember that your Empire’s Control DC is based on the number of Districts you control.

The placement of Infrastructure in your District is up to you—you can start in the center of the District and build outward or start at the edge and build toward the center. Some Infrastructure takes up more than 1 Module, while other types do not take up Modules at all Construction. Construction is completed in the same Turn you spend BP for the Infrastructure, no matter what its size is. Infrastructure benefits apply to your Empire immediately. At the GM’s discretion, certain class abilities which would aid with construction can reduce a single Infrastructure’s BP cost by 2 (minimum 0). This is a one-time reduction per Turn.

Colony Alignment: Every Colony has an alignment, which reflects the general morality of the denizens and Leadership. If a discrepancy exists between the two, the alignment reflected in the Colony’s statistics is that of the Leadership (for example, a LE city could have a CG underground insurgency).

Colony Scores: Similar to Empires, Colonies have statistics of their own which reflect the quality of life within them and determine what kinds of Infrastructure can be built within them. These statistics alter certain actions performed within the Colony.

Capability is a measure of the skill and aptitude of the Colony’s citizenry. A Colony’s Capability is added to its percentage roll to determine what happens to it in the Event Phase. In addition, the Capability score is equal to the highest-level nonspecific NPC that can easily be found in a Colony.

Culture reflects the level of information and diversity of services that players are capable of accessing within the Colony, either because the city possesses libraries of knowledge or because citizens are quite willing to share what they know. When making a skill check to research or gather information within the Colony, you may use the Colony’s Culture score in place of your ranks in the appropriate skill to determine the results of your study. In addition, for every point of Culture a Colony has, the party can expect to find creatures of one additional race or class in the city (0 or less Culture means that they are likely to find unnamed NPCs of only a single race and class)

Defense reflects how well-protected the Colony is against attacks. In mass combat, an Army stationed in a Colony may add the Colony’s Defense score to its DV. Unlike other Colony scores, a Colony’s Defense score starts at 0 rather than the Colony’s level.

Law reflects the capacity of authorities in the Colony to exert their influence over the citizenry.

Whenever illegal activity occurs in a Colony (certain extenuating circumstances may be more likely to draw the attention of authorities), the probability of an illegal act being reported in a Colony is equal to 25 + (twice the Colony’s Law score).

Supply represents the quality of goods the Colony has access to. A Colony’s Supply score is the highest level of equipment that characters are capable of purchasing in the Colony.

Generally, these statistics are equal to the Colony’s level (seen below). However, high-level Infrastructure and different forms of government are capable of altering these statistics. In addition, any of these ability scores can be compromised to grant the Colony additional BP.

During the Edict Phase, you may choose to compromise any scores. If you choose to compromise one or more of the Colony’s scores, you may voluntarily reduce one or more of the Colony’s statistics to a minimum of a negative value equal to the Colony’s level (so -12 for a 12th-level Colony).

For every 1 point by which you reduce one of the Colony’s scores, you gain one additional point of BP which can only be spent on Infrastructure in the compromised Colony. Unrest increases by 1 for every Colony which you decide to compromise.

Undoing a compromise requires spending an amount of BP equal to twice the amount you gained by compromising the Colony.

Colony Government: Each Colony possesses a unique type of local government which modifies its Colony scores in some way. A Colony’s government type can be changed during the Edict Phase, although changing the government type of one or more Colonies increases your Empire’s Unrest by 1 (in total, not per Colony)

Anarchy: No real government exists to control the Colony. +1 Capability, -1 Law

Autocracy/Magocracy: A powerful individual controls the Colony through force or magic. +1 Law, -1 Capability

Council: A group of elected or appointed individuals oversees activity in the Colony. No change to scores

Military: Generals, Warlords, and their soldiers control activity in the Colony. +1 Defense, -1 Culture

Oligarchy: A group of elite and educated individuals controls the Colony and its resources.

+1 Culture, -1 Capability

Secret Syndicate: An organization governs the Colony from the shadows, often with the veneer of some other government. +1 Supply, -1 Culture

Plutocracy: The wealthy control the Colony for their own ends. +1 Supply, -1 Capability

Utopia: Order in the Colony is formed around a social contract moreso than any form of state.

+1 Culture, -1 Law

Colony Level: Each Colony possesses a level, determined by how much BP has been invested in Infrastructure in the Colony.

Table 3-1: Colony Level Minimum BP Investment in Colony
Minimum BP Investment in Colony Colony Level Minimum BP Investment in Colony Colony Level
50 or less 1 1200 11
100 2 1400 12
150 3 1600 13
200 4 1800 14
300 5 2000 15
400 5 2250 16
500 6 2500 17
600 7 3750 18
750 8 3000 19
900 9 3300 or more 20

Founding a Colony

Before you can start your own Empire, you first need a base of operations—a fort, village, or other Colony—where you can rest between adventures and where your citizens know they can find you if they need help or want to pay their taxes. Once you have an Empire, you’ll want to create more Colonies in order for the Empire to grow and prosper. To establish a Colony, you must perform the following steps. (These steps assume you’re building a new Colony from scratch; if you’re attempting to incorporate an existing Colony into your Empire, see Free Colony).

Step 1—Acquire funds. You’ll need money and resources in the form of Build Points.

Step 2—Explore and clear a Sector. You’ll need to explore the Sector where you want to put the Colony. See the Exploration Time columns of the Topography, Biome, and Atmosphere tables to see how long this takes. Once you have explored the Sector, clear it of monsters and dangerous hazards.

The time needed to clear it depends on the nature of the threats; this step is usually handled by you completing adventures there to kill or drive out monsters.

Step 3—Claim the Sector as yours. Once you have BP and have explored and cleared the Sector, you can claim it. Spend 1 BP to do so; this represents setting up very basic Infrastructure such as clearing paths, hiring patrols, setting up basic shelters, and so on. This establishes the Sector as part of your Empire (or the beginning of your Empire).

Step 4—Prepare the site for construction. To put a Colony on a claimed Sector, you’ll need to prepare it. Depending on the site, this process may involve clearing trees, moving boulders, digging sanitation trenches, and so on. See the Preparation Cost column on Table: Terrain for the BP cost. A new Colony consists of 1 District.

Step 5—Construct your first Infrastructure. Construct 1 piece of Infrastructure in your Colony and pay its BP cost. If this is your Empire’s first Table 4-1: Topography Colony, you should start with a Residential-type Infrastructure.

When you complete these steps, you’ve founded your Colony! If this is your first Colony, it’s considered your Empire’s capital.

Terrain Statistics

Building a Colony is never a cheap affair, but some types of terrain are more accommodating than others. It is generally assumed that a certain type of terrain is effectively prevalent across a single Sector. Each piece of terrain on which a Colony can be built has its own statistics, determined by three factors.

Topography represents the overall shape of the environment, how uneven the terrain is and where it is located, in addition to the level of moisture.

Biome represents the level of life in the environment, how common plant and animal life is and how much it affects life in the Colony. This ranges from Desolate (no life whatsoever) to Overflowing (life-forms not only affect the Colony, but act as a powerful and constant threat to it)

Atmosphere displays how survivable the atmosphere is for the denizens of the Colony

Topography Type Exploration Time Preparation Time Preparation Cost Farm Cost Road Cost Mine Cost Defense Modifier Consumption Modifier
Dunes 2 Moments 1 Turn 4 BP -5 BP -6 BP -5 BP +1 BP
Hills 1 Moments 1 Turn 2 BP -6 BP -7 BP -5 BP
Ice 3 Moments 2 Turns 5 BP -4 BP -4 BP -5 BP
Mountains 2 Moments 4 Turns 10 BP -5 BP -6 BP -6 BP +2 –
Flatland 1 Moment Immediate 1 BP -8 BP -9 BP -4 BP
Underground 3 Moments 4 Turns 8 BP -4 BP -3 BP -6 BP +3 +1 BP
Underwater 3 Moments 6 Turns 16 BP -8 BP -4 BP -2 BP +4 +1 BP
Void of Space 2 Moments 6 Turns 22 BP -0 BP -4 BP +1 BP
Wasteland 1 Moment 1 Turn 5 BP -4 BP -7 BP -4 BP +1 BP
Water 2 Moments 5 Turns 12 BP -6 BP -8 BP -2 BP +2 +1 BP
Wetland 3 Moments 3 Turns 8 BP -4 BP -6 BP -4 BP
Table 4-2: Biome
Biome Type Exploration Time Preparation Time Preparation Cost Farm Cost Road Cost Mine Cost Defense Modifier Consumption Modifier
Desolate +2 Turns +10 BP +4 BP +1 BP
Sparse +1 Turn +6 BP +2 BP
Baseline
Abundant +1 Moment +1 Turn +4 BP -1 BP +2 BP
Overflowing +2 Moments +2 Turns +8 BP -1 BP +3 BP +1 +1
Topography Type Exploration Time Preparation Time Preparation Cost Farm Cost Road Cost Mine Cost Defense Modifier Consumption Modifier
Airless +2 Moments +2 Turns +4 BP +3 BP +1 +1 BP
Thin +1 Moment +1 Turn +1 BP +1 BP +1 BP
Normal
Hostile +2 Moments +2 Turns +6 BP +1 BP +1 BP +1

Table 4-3: Atmosphere

Exploration Time represents how many Moments a typical scouting party requires to explore a Sector of this type. Do not adjust the speed for Sectors that cannot be traversed on foot; it’s assumed that the party is already using a vehicle to explore.

Preparation Time represents the Turns of labor (beginning with the current Turn) required to prepare the Sector for Colonies.

Preparation Cost represents the amount of BP needed to make the territory viable for Colonies. This amount of BP must be spent to terraform the terrain before Infrastructure can be built on the terrain.

Farm Cost represents how much the cost of Farms is modified as a result of them being built in the terrain (minimum 1)

Road Cost represents how much the cost of Roads is modified as a result of them being built in the terrain (minimum 1)

Mine Cost represents how much the cost of Mines is modified as a result of them being built in the terrain (minimum 1)

Defense Modifier: Certain Colonies are easier to protect against enemy assaults due to their remote locations or other natural impediments. Hence, if using the mass combat rules, they receive the listed bonus to their defense modifier.

Consumption Modifier: Certain Terrains are harder to live on and draw resources from, and as a result have their Consumption increased by a certain amount of BP

Special Terrain

Some Sectors contain features or resources that impact an Empire’s Economy, Loyalty, Stability, and other game statistics. These terrain resources are placed by the GM—not by player characters—for you to discover while exploring or adventuring and may modify terrain improvements or cities.

Free Colony: A Free Colony is a Colony that is not part of any established Empire. Claiming a Sector with a Free Colony is an excellent way to add a fully functional Colony to your Empire. In order to claim a Free Colony Sector peacefully, you must succeed at a Stability check. Failure indicates radicals and upstarts in the Colony and Unrest increases by 1d4.

Infrastructure: The Sector contains an abandoned piece of Infrastructure in good repair (type determined by the GM). If you establish a Colony at the Infrastructure’s location in the Sector, you can incorporate the Infrastructure into the Colony at no cost (this does not count toward your Infrastructure limit for that Turn).

Lair: A Lair is usually a cave or defensible shelter that can be used as a defensive fallback point, a storage location, or even a guard post or prison. If you claim a Sector with a Lair, Stability increases by 1. If you construct a Colony over a Lair, its Defense increases by 1. At the GM’s option, a Lair may allow access to an additional underground Sector.

Landmark: A Landmark is a site of great pride, mystery, and wonder, such as a majestic mountain range, a mighty canyon, persistent auroras, a vast lake of molten metal or with geysers of unusual color or unique properties. The Landmark bolsters your Empire’s morale. If you claim a Sector with a Landmark, Loyalty increases by 1. If a Colony exists in the Sector which possesses transport Infrastructure, Loyalty increases by an additional 1.

Resource: A Resource is a ready supply of some kind of valuable commodity that offers a great economic boon to your Empire, such as exotic lumber, precious metal or minerals, drugs, furs or other rare biological materials, gems, and the like. In smaller cases, it may just be a particularly abundant source of food or other agricultural products. If you claim a Sector with a Resource, Economy increases by 1.

If you construct any extraction Infrastructures in a Sector with a Resource, all of its benefits increase by 1.

Ruin: A Ruin is a partially destroyed piece of Infrastructure. If you claim a Sector containing a Ruin and build a Colony at the Ruin’s location, you can use the Ruin as the basis of an appropriate type of Infrastructure (as determined by the GM), reducing the cost of that Infrastructure by half.

Alternatively, you can salvage building materials from the Ruin, reducing the cost of 1 Infrastructure in that Sector by 1d4 BP.

Infrastructure

Infrastructure is what differentiates a simple claimed territory from a part of an actual Empire, the roadways, buildings, and industry which enable a society to flourish in an area. A claimed area becomes a Colony as soon as the first piece of Infrastructure is built upon it.

Infrastructure is organized into nine categories, each representing a major aspect of the Colony: Agriculture, Commerce, Development, Extraction, Governance, Military, Monument, Residential, and Transit. Each of these categories also have levels from 1 to 5. In order for Infrastructure of level 2 or higher to be constructed in a Colony, the Colony must already possess at least one piece of Infrastructure that is of the same category and no more than one level lower than the Infrastructure to be built (for example, in order to create a Level 3 Plantation in a Colony, the Colony must already have a Level 2 Farm or Level 2 Storehouse, or some Agriculture Infrastructure of a higher level). Level 1 Infrastructure never possesses prerequisites.

Depending on its level, Infrastructure costs varying amounts of BP and takes up a varying number of Modules.

A piece of Infrastructure with multiple levels can be upgraded to a higher level if there are sufficient Modules and BP for its upgrade in the Colony, and the cost of creating the higher-level Infrastructure is reduced by the difference between its cost and the cost of the Infrastructure it is being upgraded from.

Each piece of Infrastructure adds something to the Empire’s function overall, be it the boosting of the Empire’s vital statistics, the modification of the Colony’s scores, or the facilitation of other Empire functions based upon the Infrastructure’s category boon. In order to construct Infrastructure on a Sector, you must first pay that Sector’s preparation cost.

The power behind Infrastructure is nonspecific, to reflect the fact that a Colony can achieve development through numerous combinations of magic, technology, and raw manpower.

Agricultural Infrastructure

Category Boon: Reduce your Empire’s Consumption by an amount equal to the number of Modules filled with Agriculture Infrastructure in Colonies you control, to a minimum Consumption of 0.

Level 1 (10 BP)

Farm Empire: Economy +1, Stability +1

Storehouse Empire: Stability +1, Loyalty +1

Level 2 (20 BP)

Farm Empire: Stability +2, Economy +2

Storehouse Empire: Stability +2, Loyalty +2

Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Farm Empire: Stability +4, Economy +2

Colony: Capability +1

Plantation Empire: Economy +6

Colony: Supply +1

Storehouse Empire: Economy +2, Stability +2, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +1

Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Farm Empire: Economy +4, Stability +4

Colony: Capability +2

Plantation Empire: Economy +6, Loyalty +2

Colony: Culture +1, Supply +1

Storehouse Empire: Economy +2, Stability +4, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +1, Law +1

Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules)

Farm Empire: Economy +4, Stability +6

Colony: Capability +2, Supply +2

Plantation Empire: Economy +8, Loyalty +2

Colony: Culture +2, Supply +2

Commerce Infrastructure

Category Boon: When selling items in a Colony, the fraction of the price that players can sell items at increases by 5% for every Module in the Colony filled with Commerce Infrastructure (from a base of 10%, to a maximum of 100%).

Level 1 (10 BP)

Market Empire: Economy +1, Stability +1

Black Market Empire: Economy +4, Unrest +1

Level 2 (20 BP)

Market Empire: Economy +3, Stability +1

Black Market Empire: Economy +8, Stability -2, Unrest +1

Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Market Empire: Economy +4, Stability +2

Colony: Supply +1

Bank Empire: Economy +3, Stability +3

Colony: Law +1

Black Market Empire: Economy +12, Stability -4, Unrest +1

Colony: Capability +1, Law -1, Supply +1

Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Market Empire: Economy +6, Stability +2

Colony: Supply +2

Bank Empire: Economy +4, Stability +4

Colony: Law +1, Supply +1

Black Market Empire: Economy +14, Stability -2, Unrest +2

Colony: Capability +2, Law -2, Supply +2

Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules)

Market Empire: Economy +6, Stability +4

Colony: Supply +4

Bank Empire: Economy +4, Stability +4, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +1, Law +2, Supply +1

Black Market Empire: Economy +16, Stability -2, Unrest +2

Colony: Capability +3, Law -2, Supply +3

Cultural Infrastructure

Category Boon: If you ever lose control of the Colony, any Loyalty checks made to re-assimilate it into your Empire gain a bonus equal to the number of Modules filled with Monument Infrastructure.

Level 1 (10 BP)

Meeting Place Empire: Stability +2

Monument Empire: Loyalty +2

Level 2 (20 BP)

Meeting Place Empire: Stability +4

Monument Empire: Loyalty +4

Temple Empire: Loyalty +2, Stability +2

Theater Empire: Economy +2, Stability +2

Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Meeting Place Empire: Loyalty +2, Stability +4

Colony: Law +1

Monument Empire: Loyalty +6

Colony: Culture +1

Temple Empire: Loyalty +4, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +1

Theater Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +1

Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Arena Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +4

Colony: Capability +1, Law +1

Meeting Place Empire: Loyalty +4, Stability +4

Colony: Law +2

Monument Empire: Loyalty +8

Colony: Culture +2

Temple Empire: Loyalty +4, Stability +4

Colony: Culture +2

Theater Empire: Economy +4, Loyalty +2, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +2

Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules)

Arena Empire: Economy +4, Loyalty +2, Stability +4

Colony: Capability +2, Law +2

Meeting Place Empire: Loyalty +6, Stability +4

Colony: Law +4

Monument Empire: Loyalty +10

Colony: Culture +4

Temple Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +4, Stability +4

Colony: Culture +2, Law +2

Theater Empire: Economy +4, Stability +4, Loyalty +2

Colony: Culture +4

Developmental Infrastructure

Category Boon: When hiring assistance to deal with an Event confined to the Colony, the bonus from hiring assistance increases by an amount equal to the number of Modules filled with Development Infrastructure.

Level 1 (10 BP)

Medical Facility Empire: Stability +2

Sanitation Facility Empire: Stability +2

Workshop Empire: Economy +2

Level 2 (20 BP)

Academy Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2

Medical Facility Empire: Stability +4, Loyalty +2

Research Facility Empire: Economy +2, Stability +2

Sanitation Facility Empire: Stability +4

Workshop Empire: Economy +4

Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Academy Empire: Economy +3, Loyalty +3

Colony: +1 Capability Factory Empire: Economy +6

Colony: Supply +1

Medical Facility Empire: Stability +4, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +1

Research Facility Empire: Economy +4, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +1

Sanitation Facility Empire: Stability +6

Colony: Capability +1

Workshop Empire: Economy +4, Loyalty +2

Colony: Culture +1

Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Academy Empire: Economy +4, Loyalty +4

Colony: +1 Capability, +1 Culture Factory Empire: Economy +6, Stability +2

Colony: Supply +2

Medical Facility Empire: Stability +4, Economy +2, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +2

Research Facility Empire: Economy +4, Stability +4

Colony: Culture +1, Supply +1

Sanitation Facility Empire: Stability +6, Economy +2

Colony: Capability +1, Supply +1

Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules)

Academy Empire: Economy +6, Loyalty +4

Colony: Capability +2, Culture +2

Factory Empire: Economy +6, Stability +4

Colony: Supply +4

Medical Facility Empire: Stability +6, Economy +2, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +4

Research Facility Empire: Economy +4, Stability +4, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +1, Culture +2, Supply +1

Sanitation Facility Empire: Stability +8, Economy +2

Colony: Capability +2, Supply +2

Extraction Infrastructure

Category Boon: For every Module filled with Extraction Infrastructure in a Colony, reduce the cost of crafting items in the Colony by 5% (to a maximum of 75%)

Level 1 (10 BP)

Mill Empire: Economy +1, Stability +1

Mine Empire: Economy +2

Level 2 (20 BP)

Mill Empire: Economy +2, Stability +2

Mine Empire: Economy +4

Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Mill Empire: Economy +4, Stability +2

Colony: Supply +1

Mine Empire: Economy +6

Colony: Supply +1

Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Mill Empire: Economy +4, Stability +4

Colony: Supply +2

Mine Empire: Economy +8

Colony: Supply +2

Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules)

Mill Empire: Economy +6, Stability +4

Colony: Supply +4

Mine Empire: Economy +8, Loyalty +2

Colony: Supply +4

Governance Infrastructure

Category Boon: If you have at least one piece of Governance Infrastructure in a Colony, all Continuous Events in the Colony have a maximum Turn duration of 15 minus the number of Modules filled with Governance Infrastructure in the Colony (minimum 1 Turn)

Level 1 (10 BP)

Court Empire: +2 Stability Leaders’ Office Empire: +2 Loyalty Level 2 (20 BP)

Court Empire: +4 Stability Civil Service Empire: +1 Economy, +1 Loyalty, +2 Stability Leaders’ Office Empire: +4 Loyalty Prison Empire: +2 Stability, -1 Unrest Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Court Empire: +2 Loyalty, +4 Stability Colony: +1 Law Civil Service Empire: +2 Economy, +2 Loyalty, +2 Stability Colony: +1 Capability Leaders’ Office Empire: +4 Loyalty, +2 Stability Colony: +1 Culture Prison Empire: +4 Stability, -1 Unrest Colony: -1 Capability, +2 Law Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Court Empire: +2 Economy, +2 Loyalty, +4 Stability Colony: +2 Law Civil Service Empire: +2 Economy, +2 Loyalty, +2 Stability, -1 Unrest Colony: +2 Capability Leaders’ Office Empire: +4 Loyalty, +4 Stability Colony: +1 Culture, +1 Law Prison Empire: +4 Stability, -2 Unrest Colony: -2 Capability, +4 Law Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules)

Court Empire: +2 Economy, +2 Loyalty, +6 Stability Colony: +4 Law 28

Civil Service Empire: +2 Economy, +2 Loyalty, +4 Stability, -1 Unrest Colony: +2 Capability, +2 Culture Leaders’ Office Empire: +6 Loyalty, +4 Stability Colony: +2 Culture, +2 Law Prison Empire: +6 Stability, -2 Unrest Colony: -2 Capability, +6 Law

Military Infrastructure

Category Boon: For every Module in the Colony filled with Military Infrastructure, you gain a +1 bonus to Loyalty checks made to recruit an army from that Colony, and the Colony can maintain an army whose ACR is one higher.

Level 1 (10 BP)

Garrison Empire: Stability +2

Lookout Empire: Loyalty +1, Stability +1

Level 2 (20 BP)

Fortifications Empire: Stability +2, Unrest -1

Garrison Empire: Loyalty +1, Stability +3

Lookout Empire: Loyalty +1, Stability +1, Unrest -1

Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Fortifications Empire: Loyalty +2, Stability +2, Unrest -1

Colony: Defense +1

Garrison Empire: Loyalty +2, Stability +4

Colony: Defense +1

Lookout Empire: Loyalty +2, Stability +2, Unrest -1

Colony: Law +1

Training Facility Empire: Loyalty +4, Stability +2

Colony: Capability +1

Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Fortifications Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2, Unrest -1

Colony: Defense +2

Garrison Empire: Loyalty +2, Stability +6

Colony: Capability +1, Defense +1

Lookout Empire: Loyalty +3, Stability +3, Unrest -1

Colony: Law +2

Training Facility Empire: Loyalty +4, Stability +4

Colony: Capability +2

Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules)

Fortifications Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2, Unrest –2

Colony: Defense +4

Garrison Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +6

Colony: Capability +2, Defense +2

Training Facility Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +4, Stability +4

Colony: Capability +4

Residential Infrastructure

Category Boon: For the purpose of determining the level of the Colony, all BP invested in Residential Infrastructure counts as twice as much BP.

Level 1 (10 BP, 1 Module)

Hostel Empire: Economy +1, Loyalty +1

Residency Empire: Stability +1, Unrest -1

Level 2 (20 BP, 1 Module)

Hostel Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2

Residency Empire: Stability +2, Unrest -2

Complex Empire: Stability +4

Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Hostel Empire: Economy +3, Loyalty +3

Colony: Culture +1

Residency Empire: Economy +2, Stability +2, Unrest -1

Colony: Law +1

Complex Empire: Stability +4, Unrest -1

Colony: Law +1

Palace Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +1

Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Hostel Empire: Economy +4, Loyalty +4

Colony: Culture +2

Residency Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2, Unrest -1

Colony: Culture +1, Law +1

Complex Empire: Economy +2, Stability +4, Unrest -2

Colony: Law +2

Palace Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +4, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +1, Law +1

Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules, Fame +1)

Hostel Empire: Economy +4, Loyalty +4, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +4

Complex Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2, Unrest -2

Colony: Law +2, Culture +2

Palace Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +6, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +2, Law +2

Transportation Infrastructure

Category Boon: For every Module filled with Transportation Infrastructure, reduce travel times inside the Colony and between the Colony and neighboring Colonies by 5% (to a maximum reduction of 15% x the highest level of Transportation Infrastructure you possess in the Colony). When traveling between two Colonies with Transportation Infrastructure, bonuses from this category boon stack, but the combined result cannot surpass the maximum reduction of whichever Colony has higher-level Transportation Infrastructure.

Level 1 (10 BP)

Roads Empire: Economy +1, Loyalty +1

Level 2 (20 BP)

Port Empire: Economy +4

Roads Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +1, Stability +1

Level 3 (40 BP, 2 Modules)

Port Empire: Economy +6

Colony: Culture +1

Public Transit Empire: Economy +3, Stability +3

Colony: Culture +1

Roads Empire: Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2

Colony: Culture +1

Level 4 (60 BP, 2 Modules)

Port Empire: Economy +8

Colony: Culture +1, Supply +1

Public Transit Empire: Economy +3, Stability +3, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +1, Culture +1

Roads Empire: Economy +4, Loyalty +2, Stability +2

Colony: Capability +1, Culture +1

Level 5 (80 BP, 4 Modules)

Port Empire: Economy +10

Colony: Culture +2, Supply +2

Public Transit Empire: Economy +4, Stability +4, Loyalty +2

Colony: Capability +2, Culture +2

Roads Empire: Economy +4, Loyalty +4, Stability +2

Colony: Capability +1, Culture +1, Law +1, Supply +1

Events

Listed below are Events that can happen during an Empire’s Event Phase. Most Events occur immediately and are instantaneous or terminate at the end of the Event Phase.

Some Events impact the whole Empire, while others are centered on a specific Colony or Sector. Roll on Table 5-1: Event Type to determine the type of Event and whether it is beneficial or harmful. Then roll on the appropriate beneficial or dangerous Colony or Empire Event table. If this results in an invalid Event, roll again.

Some events may reference an Empire’s Fame or Infamy. See the Fame and Infamy variant ruleset for information on how these aspects work. If you are not using these rules, you may simply ignore any effects upon Fame or Infamy.

Continuous Events: A Continuous Event’s effects continue each Turn during the Event Phase until you resolve the Event (as explained in the Event description, usually by succeeding at an Empire check).

Localized Events: Some Events are listed as “Colony” or “Sector.” The effect of these Events are localized to a single Colony or Sector. Randomly select a Colony or Sector for the location of that Event (this is best done through an evenly-distributed die roll, a deck of cards, or some other nonbiased means). Some Events (such as a Feud) could be confined to a Colony or start in one Colony and spread to affect the entire Empire, depending on whether they’re rolled on one of the Empire Events tables or one of the Colony Events tables.

Colony Modifiers: Some Events adjust Colony modifiers (Law, Culture, etc.). If an Event is localized to 1 Colony, its Colony modifier adjustments apply only to that Colony; if it’s localized to a Sector, it affects only Colonies in that Sector. If the Event is not localized, its adjustments apply to the final modifier for every Colony in the entire Empire. For example, the new subjects Event increases Culture and Capability for the entire Empire by 1.

Hiring Assistance: Once per Event Phase, you can hire NPCs to help deal with an Event, gaining a bonus on one Economy, Loyalty, or Stability check made as part of that Event. For every 2 points of BP you spend, you gain a +1 bonus on the check.

Table 5-1: Event Type
d% Event
01-02 Boom Period and roll again
03-04 Good Weather and roll again
05-50 Empire Event
51-95 Colony Event Raiders and roll again
97 Squatters and roll again
98 Attack and roll again
99 Vandals and roll again
100 Invasion and Roll Again

Archaeological Find: A well-preserved ruin is found in your Empire, with historical artifacts connected to a race which lived there long ago. Effect: Increase the Culture score of all of your Colonies by 1.

Assassination Attempt: One of your Leaders (determined randomly) is the target of an assassination attempt. If the target is a PC, the GM should run the attempt as an encounter, using an assassin of a CR equal to the targeted PC’s level.

If the target is an NPC, you must succeed at a Stability check to prevent the assassination. If the assassination occurs, Unrest increases by 1d6 and the Empire immediately incurs the penalties for not having a Leader in that Role.

Attack (Colony, Continuous): An enemy (or group of enemies) attacks the Empire. The GM picks a claimed Sector in the Empire in which the monster is active. The CR of the monster encounter is equal to the party’s level + 1d4 – 1. You can personally deal with the monster (earning XP and treasure normally for your efforts) or succeed at a Stability check to eliminate it (which doesn’t affect you or the Empire’s statistics). If the attacker is not defeated this Turn, Unrest increases by 4. If the Empire’s Unrest is 5 or higher, the attacker’s Sector becomes unclaimed— this is in addition to losing control of Sectors in the Upkeep Phase because of the Empire’s high Unrest score.

Table 5-2: Empire Events
d% Event
01-03 Assassination Attempt
04-08 Raiders
09-13 Feud
14-17 Food Shortage
18-22 Radical Activity
23-25 Foreign Espionage
26-29 Large Disaster
30-34 Attack
35-38 Invasion
39-42 Plague
43-46 Public Scandal
47-50 Smugglers
51-54 Archeological Find
55-58 Diplomatic Overture
59-62 Discovery
63-66 Economic Boon
67-70 Festive Invitation
71-74 Food Surplus
75-78 Land Rush
79-82 Boom Period
83-86 Good Weather
87-90 Immigrant Influx
91-94 Visiting Diplomats
95-100 Political Calm

Boom Period: Productivity, functionality, and overall confidence are up. Economy, Loyalty, and Productivity increase by 2 until the next Event Phase.

Boomtown (Colony): Randomly select one Colony. Commerce booms among that Colony. Until the next Event Phase, Economy increases by the number of Infrastructure in the Colony that grant an Economy bonus, but Capability decreases by 1d4 in that Colony.

Building Demand (Colony, Continuous): The citizens demand a particular Infrastructure be built (01–75) or demolished (76–100). Select the Infrastructure type randomly from those available.

Table 5-3: Colony Events
d% + Colony’s Capability Score Event
1-4 Building Demand
5-9 Famine
10-14 Localized Disaster
15-19 Drug Trade
20-24 Feud
25-29 Vandals
30-34 Radical Activity
35-39 Attack
40-44 Plague
45-49 Sensational Crime
50-54 Slavers
55-59 Squatters
60-64 Invasion
65-69 Population Surge
70-74 Traveling Entertainers
75-79 Economic Boom
80-84 Discovery
85-89 Justice Prevails
90-94 Unexpected Find
95-99 Unearthed Resource
100-104 Tribute
105-109 Visiting Celebrity
110-114 Wealthy Immigrant
115+ Outstanding Success for the Colony.

If the demand is not met by the next Event Phase, Unrest increases by 1. Alternatively, you can suppress the citizens’ demands and negate the Event by succeeding at a Loyalty check, but this reduces Loyalty by 2 and increases Unrest by 1.

Diplomatic Overture: A nearby Empire sends an ambassador to you to negotiate an Embassy (01–60), Treaty (61–90), or Alliance (91–100), as if using a Diplomatic Edict (see Special Edicts). If the GM doesn’t have an appropriate Empire in mind when this Event occurs, determine the Empire’s alignment randomly; it may be hostile or friendly. The ambassador bears 1d4 BP worth of gifts for your Empire.

Discovery (Colony): Scholars unearth a bit of ancient lore or devise important new research of their own. Fame increases by 1 and either Culture or Supply increases by 1d4 (roll to determine which score is increased, or the GM may decide based on the nature of the discovery).

Drug Trade (Colony, Continuous): One of your Colonies becomes a hive of illicit drug trade.

Attempt a Loyalty check and a Stability check, with a penalty equal to the number of Black Markets and Modules with Squatters in the Colony (see the Squatters event). If you succeed at both checks, you eliminate the drug trade before your Empire takes any penalties from the Event. If you fail at one check, Unrest increases by 1 while Capability and Law decrease by 1. If you fail at both checks, Unrest increases by 1; Capability, Economy, Law, Loyalty, and Stability decrease by 1; and on the next Event Phase, a second drug trade Event occurs in the same Colony (01–50) or the nearest Colony (51–100).

Economic Boom: Trade is booming in your Empire!

Your Treasury increases by 1d6 BP (each time you roll a 6, add the result to the total and roll again).

Famine (Colony): Pests, blight, and weather ruin the harvest in the Colony’s Sector and all adjacent Sectors. Attempt two Stability checks.

If both succeed, the problem is fixed before your Empire takes any penalties from the Event. If only one succeeds, halve any reduction in Consumption caused by Agriculture Infrastructure in the next Upkeep Phase (rounded down). If neither succeeds, Agriculture Infrastructure does not reduce Consumption at all in the next Upkeep Phase.

Feud (Colony, Continuous): Influential rival groups are bickering. Attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, you end the Event but Unrest increases by 1. If you fail, Capability decreases by 1, Unrest increases by 1d6, and the Event is Continuous.

Food Shortage: Spoilage, treachery, or bad luck has caused a food shortage this Turn. Attempt a Stability check. If you succeed, Consumption in the next Upkeep Phase increases by 50%. If you fail, Consumption in the next Upkeep Phase increases by 100%.

Food Surplus: Your Empire produces an unexpected windfall! In the next Upkeep Phase, the Empire’s Consumption is halved (but returns to normal on the next Turn).

Foreign Espionage: A spy from another Empire is discovered trying to find out the Empire’s weaknesses. Increase Unrest by 1.

Good Weather: A natural Event raises your Empire’s morale. You gain a +4 bonus on Stability checks until the next Event Phase.

Immigration Influx: A population comes into your Empire with interests aligned with yours. Capability and Culture in all of your Colonies increase by 1, and your Treasury increases by 1d6 BP (each time you roll a 6, add the result to the total and roll again).

Invasion (Colony, Continuous): A nearby Empire sends an army to attack the Empire (roll randomly to determine which Empire sends the army). The GM picks a claimed Sector in the Empire in which the invading army is active. The ACR of the army is equal to the party’s level + 1d4 – 1 or the highest ACR the Colony can field, whichever is lower. To deal with it, the Leaders must either go to fight it or send an army to take it down. If the attacker is not defeated this Turn, Unrest increases by 4. If the Empire’s Unrest is 5 or higher, the attacked Sector becomes unclaimed—this is in addition to losing control of Sectors in the Upkeep Phase because of the Empire’s high Unrest score.

Justice Prevails (Colony): Authorities shut down a major criminal operation or thwart a plot against the Colony. Law and Loyalty increase by 1 and Unrest decreases by 1.

Land Rush: Overeager settlers claim an unclaimed Sector, found a Colony, and construct a level 1 Farm, Mine, or Mill at their own expense, but are fighting over ownership. This Sector is not part of your Empire, so you gain no benefits from it.

Capability, Supply, and Stability decrease by 1.

Attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, Unrest increases by 1. If you fail, Unrest increases by 1d4.

If you construct a Colony in the Sector during your next Edict Phase, remove this Event’s changes to Capability, Supply, and Stability Large Disaster (Sector): A tremendous natural cataclysm strikes! Roll 1d6; on a result of 1–5, the disaster threatens only 1 Sector. On a result of 6, the disaster is widespread and threatens 1d6 additional Sectors adjacent to the target unit. In each targeted Sector, this functions as the Localized Disaster Event, save that it affects every Colony in a targeted Sector once.

Localized Disaster (Colony): A natural disaster strikes the Colony! Roll 1d6 to determine how many Modules are threatened by the disaster. On a result of 6, the disaster is widespread and affects 1d6 additional adjacent Modules. Attempt a Stability check for each threatened Module; failure means the disaster destroys the Infrastructure in that Module and Unrest increases by 1.

Outstanding Success (Colony): One of your Empire’s citizens creates an artistic masterpiece, constructs a particularly impressive piece of Infrastructure, or otherwise brings glory to your Empire. Fame increases by 1, your Treasury increases by 1d6 BP, and Unrest decreases by 2.

You gain a +4 bonus on Economy checks until the next Event Phase.

Plague (Sector or Colony, Continuous): A deadly sickness strikes the target unit or Colony. You cannot construct Infrastructure there while plague persists.

Attempt two Stability checks, each with a penalty equal to the number of Modules filled with Transit and Exchange Infrastructure in the Sector/Colony, and a bonus equal to the number of Modules filled with Development and Governance Infrastructure in the Sector/Colony. If you succeed at both checks, the Event ends, but Stability decreases by 2 and Treasury by 1d3 BP. If you fail at one check, Stability decreases by 4, Treasury decreases by 1d6 BP, and Unrest increases by 1d3. If you fail at both, Stability decreases by 4, Treasury decreases by 1d6 BP, Unrest increases by 1d6, and in the next Event Phase the plague spreads to an adjacent Sector/Colony.

Political Calm: A sudden absence of political machinations coincides with an increase in public approval. Unrest decreases by 1d6. Until the next Event Phase, you gain a +2 bonus on checks to resolve Continuous Events. If your Empire has no Unrest and no Continuous Events, both Loyalty and Stability increase by 1. This also increases Law by 1 for the entire Empire.

Population Surge (Colony): The Colony experiences a rapid increase in population, either due to immigration or a reproductive spike coming to fruition. The Colony’s Capability increases by 1d6-2.

Public Scandal: One of your Leaders is implicated in a crime or an embarrassing situation. Infamy increases by 1. Attempt a Loyalty check. If you fail, Unrest increases by 2 and you take a –4 penalty on all Loyalty checks until the next Event Phase.

Radical Activity (Colony, Continuous): Zealots mobilize public opinion against a particular race, religion, Empire, behavior, or Leader. Attempt a Loyalty check. If you fail, the radicals run rampant; Infamy increases by 1 and Capability, Culture, Loyalty, and Stability decrease by 2. If you succeed, the zealots are somewhat suppressed; Capability, Culture, Loyalty, and Stability decrease by 1. Two successful checks in a row end the Event (if a check ends the Event, no penalties from it occur that Turn).

Raiders: Bandits, pirates, or other criminals are preying upon those who travel through your Empire. Attempt a Stability check. If you succeed, your Empire’s defenses stop the bandits before they cause any harm. If you fail, the raiders reduce your Empire’s Treasury by 1d6 BP (each time you roll a 6, add the result to the total and roll again).

Sensational Crime (Colony, Continuous): A serial killer, arsonist, or daring bandit plagues your Empire. Attempt two Stability checks, adding the Colony’s Law and subtracting its Crime. If you succeed at both checks, the criminal is caught before your Empire takes any penalties from the Event. If you fail at one, the criminal escapes, Unrest increases by 1, and the Event is Continuous. If you fail at both, the criminal makes a fool of the authorities; Law and Loyalty decrease by 1, Treasury decreases by 1d4 BP, Unrest increases by 2, and the Event is Continuous.

Slavers (Colony, Continuous): Criminals begin kidnapping citizens and selling them into slavery.

Attempt a Loyalty check and a Stability check, each with a penalty equal to the number of Modules with Black Markets and Modules with Squatters in the Colony (see the Squatters event). If you succeed at both checks, the slavers are caught before your Empire takes any penalties from the Event. If you fail at one of the checks, Loyalty, Stability, and Unrest decrease by 1, but the Event is not Continuous. If you fail at both checks, Loyalty, Stability, and Unrest decrease by 2, and the Event is Continuous.

Smugglers (Continuous): Unscrupulous merchants are subverting legitimate businesses.

Attempt a Loyalty check and a Stability check, each with a penalty equal to the number of Modules filled with Black Markets or transit Infrastructure in the Empire. If you succeed at both checks, the smugglers are stopped before your Empire takes any penalties from the Event. If you fail at one of the checks, Law, Supply, and Capability decrease by 1d2 in each Colony, Treasury decreases by 1d3 BP, and the Event is not Continuous. If you fail at both of the checks, these penalties double and the Event is Continuous.

Squatters (Colony, Continuous): An empty Colony Module is taken over by beggars, troublemakers, and people unable to find adequate work or housing. You cannot use the Module for anything until the squatters are dispersed. Fame and Stability decrease by 1, and Unrest increases by 2. You may try to disperse the squatters with a Stability check. Success means the squatters are dispersed and the Event is not Continuous, but if Residential Infrastructure is not built in that Module on the next Turn, Infamy increases by 1 and Unrest by 2. Failing the Stability check means the Event is Continuous, and you may not build on that Module until the Event is resolved.

Traveling Entertainers (Colony): A traveling circus or entertainers’ troupe visits the Colony. You gain 1d4 BP and a +4 bonus on Stability checks until your next Event Phase. Reduce your Unrest by 2.

Tribute (Colony): A wealthy sponsor offers to construct a level 1 Monument Infrastructure or upgrade a Monument Infrastructure by 1 level in your Colony. The sponsor pays all costs and Consumption for this purpose.

Unearthed Resource (Colony): The Colony finds a valuable material resource which can be put either towards trade or production. Until the next Event Phase, the Colony’s Supply Score is treated as being 50% higher.

Unexpected Find (Colony): Local citizens discover a forgotten artifact, ruined piece of Infrastructure, or local phenomenon which can be turned somehow to the Empire’s advantage. The Empire gains 1d6 additional BP

Vandals (Colony): Dissidents riot and destroy property. Attempt a Loyalty check and a Stability check. If you succeed at both, the vandals are stopped before your Empire takes any penalties.

If you fail at one check, Culture decreases by 1 and one random Infrastructure in the Colony is damaged (the GM rolls to determine which Colony is damaged). If you fail at both, one random Infrastructure is destroyed (Unrest increases by 1 for each Module of the destroyed Infrastructure), and 1d3 other random pieces of Infrastructure are damaged. Damaged Infrastructure provides no benefits until half its cost is spent repairing it.

Visiting Celebrity (Colony): A celebrity from another Empire visits one of your Colonies, causing a sudden influx of other visitors and spending. Fame increases by 1 and Treasury increases by 1d6 BP (each time you roll a 6, add the result to the total and roll again).

Visiting Diplomats: Diplomats from neighboring Empires arrive to participate in a fete held in their honor. If the Empire size is between 3 and 25 Sectors, the Empire’s leaders can invite one diplomat; between 26 and 50 Sectors, two diplomats; 51 and 100 three diplomats; and over 100 Sectors, an additional diplomat for every 100 Sectors.

Whether or not the diplomats show up depends on the relationships between the Empires (the GM is encouraged to roleplay this out). You gain a +2 bonus on Economy checks for every diplomat that shows up to the fete until your next Event Phase.

Wealthy Immigrant (Colony): A rich individual is impressed with your Empire and asks to construct a Palace of as high a level as possible (or a Hostel if a Palace cannot be built) in the Colony at no cost to you. If you allow it, the Infrastructure provides its normal benefits to your Empire.

Relativity and Galactic Empires Conceivably, an Empire of multiple star systems may be so large that the laws of relativity may cause certain parts of it to operate at different speeds. One Turn passing on a certain star system may mean several Turns or even years passing on another.

There are two ways to approach this. The first is to say that the difference in time passage is inconsequential to the function of society or handwave relativity as nonexistent in the space fantasy setting [note that this may lead to physics-inclined players pursuing strange tactics].

The other is to actually integrate variable time passage as another facet of galactic strategy, an advantage which players and rival Empires can utilize. Perhaps Sectors with accelerated passages of time are used to produce materials rapidly, or important individuals or materials reside in Sectors where time runs slower so as to defer their aging. Time dilation could add an interesting wrinkle to interstellar engagements for GMs willing to perform the necessary bookkeeping.

Advanced Empire Rules

The following sections are optional rules for the Empire-building system. These rules are modular; if the group prefers a simpler version of the Empire rules, the GM can ignore these options. Many of these optional rules introduce more math into Empire-building and use complex formulas to derive additional effects to be placed on the Empire. The GM decides whether to use any of these optional rules in the campaign, and whether to keep or discard them if they interfere with the campaign’s intended style of play. Many of the Advanced Empire Rules involve new Edicts you can issue to undertake more complex tasks or things that your empire might not normally be able to do.

These new edict types include Commission Edicts, Diplomatic Edicts, Endowment Edicts, Espionage Edicts, Exploration Edicts, Festival Edicts, Trade Edicts, Vassalage Edicts, and Withdrawal Edicts.

Colony Sizes

The GM may want to adjust Colony modifiers based on the Empire’s Size and how that corresponds to the standard Colony size categories. Add the listed modifier numbers to the Colony’s Capability, Culture, Law, and Supply scores.

Table 6-1: Colony Size Modifiers
Modules Modifiers
1 -4
2-8 -2
9-20
21-40 +1
41-100 +1 per District

Commissions

You can commission an item to be made (or an existing item improved) for personal use with a Commission Edict. Leaders must pay full price for commissioned items. The commission Edict takes effect in a Colony, and the commissioned item’s level cannot be higher than the Colony’s Supply Score. The Empire’s leaders can commission more than one item within that city as part of the same Commission Edict, but a single Colony cannot craft items in an amount where the combined level of the items exceeds its Supply Score. Commissioning more than one item with the same Commission Edict generates 1 point of Unrest for each item after the first in each Colony, representing the anger and resentment of other wealthy customers caused by their own requests being superseded by those of the Empire’s leaders, and of the crafters themselves for being forced to work on demand.

Diplomacy

Diplomacy in this system is achieved by using a Diplomatic Edict to establish an Embassy, Treaty, or Alliance with another Empire. You must have an official representative of your Empire, such as an ambassador or Leader, present in the other Empire to make this Edict (though the GM may allow long-distance communication to handle most of the Edict’s details and bypass this requirement). Using this Edict costs 1d4 BP in travel and other expenses.

Your representative must attempt a Diplomacy check. The DC is determined using the following formula:

DC = 10 + your Empire’s Infamy + the target Empire’s special Size modifier + your Empire’s special Size modifier + ethos difference modifier + relationship modifier + the target Empire’s attitude – your Empire’s Fame – BP you spend on bribes or gifts Special Size Modifier: This is equal to the Empire’s Size divided by 5.

Ethos Difference Modifier: This is based on how close your Empire’s alignment is to the target Empire’s alignment, according to the following table.

Table 6-2: Diplomatic Ethos Difference Modifier
Ethos Difference DC Modifier
Same -5
1 difference +0
2 differences/1 same and 1 opposed +5
1 opposed +10
2 opposed +15

Relationship Modifier: This takes into account your Treaties, alliances, and conflicts with the target Empire’s allies and enemies. If you are friendly with the same Empires, the target is more interested in diplomacy with you. If you are friendly with the target Empire’s enemies, the target is less interested in negotiating with you. Modify the DC as follows for each third party you have in common.

Table 6-3: Diplomatic Relationship Modifier
Relationship DC Modifier
You and the target Empire both have an Alliance with a third party –8
You have a Treaty with the target Empire’s ally –4
You and the target Empire both have a Treaty with a third party –2
You have an Embassy target Empire’s enemy with the +2
You have a Treaty with the target +5

Empire’s enemy Attitude: Much like the starting attitude of an NPC, the target Empire’s initial attitude toward you is Indifferent, though the GM may modify this based on alignment differences, your shared history, culture, warfare, espionage, racial tensions, and 38 other factors in the campaign world. These factors may also influence the Diplomacy DC for using this Edict (generally increasing the DC by 5 for every attitude step worse than helpful).

The act of making this Diplomacy check takes place over several days, with the emissary socializing with representatives of the target Empire, discussing common interests and the benefits and goals of entering a Diplomatic agreement with your Empire.

Because this check is not a singular Event, abilities and spells that modify a single roll have no effect on this check unless they last at least 24 hours.

Type Of Diplomatic Relationships

You use Diplomatic Edicts to establish an Embassy, Treaty, or Alliance; each is a closer relation than the previous one.

Embassy: You attempt to establish mutual recognition of authority and territory with the target Empire, represented by granting dominion over Embassies in each other’s Colonies. Attempt a Diplomacy check using the Diplomatic Edict DC. If the Diplomacy check fails, the other Empire rejects your Diplomatic efforts and you cannot attempt to establish an Embassy with it again for 10 Turns; if the check fails by 5 or more, your Empire’s Fame decreases by 1 and the other Empire’s attitude toward your Empire worsens by 1 step.

If you succeed at the Diplomacy check, you create an Embassy agreement with the target Empire; if you succeed at the check by 5 or more, the target Empire’s attitude toward your Empire improves by 1 step and your Empire’s Fame increases by 1.

You may purchase or build a piece of Residential Infrastructure of at least 3rd level in one of the other Empire’s Colonies to use as an Embassy (if so, your ambassador uses it as a residence). The target Empire’s Leaders may do the same in one of your Colonies. Your Embassy is considered your territory (and vice versa). Your Embassy grants your Empire the normal bonuses for Infrastructure of its type (they apply to your Empire’s totals but not to any specific Colony in your Empire) and increases Consumption by 1, Economy by 2, and one of the Colony’s scores by 2. If the target Empire builds an Embassy in one of your Colonies, that Empire gains these bonuses.

If you founded your Empire with the support of a wealthy sponsor from another Empire, your Empire automatically has an Embassy agreement with your sponsor’s, and you can use Diplomatic Edicts to establish a Treaty or an Alliance.

Alternatively, your envoy may attempt to threaten rather than befriend the other Empire. In this case, your envoy attempts an Intimidate check, applying your Empire’s Infamy as a bonus. You also gain a +1 bonus for every active army your Empire has.

This check’s DC is the same as the Diplomatic Edict DC above, except your Fame and Infamy do not modify it. You may spend BP on bribes or gifts to modify the DC. Your Infamy increases by 1 whether you succeed or fail at the check. If you succeed at the check, you create an Embassy agreement with the target Empire. If you fail, the target Empire’s attitude toward you worsens by 1 step, Infamy increases by an additional 1 and you cannot make 39 this threat again for 10 Turns. If it fails by 5 or more, the Empire’s attitude toward you worsens by 2 steps and Infamy increases by an additional 1; if the Empire’s attitude becomes or is already hostile, it declares war on you.

An Embassy is considered a permanent agreement. Replacing your ambassador does not affect the Edict or the Embassy. If you want to close your Embassy and break the Embassy agreement, attempt a Loyalty check. Success means you close the Embassy. Failure means your citizens reject the idea of severing ties with the other Empire and continue to staff the Embassy; you may try again next Turn.

If you attack an Empire with which you have an Embassy, attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, your Infamy increases by 1. If you fail, Infamy and Unrest both increase by 1.

Treaty: If you have an Embassy agreement with another Empire, you can approach that Empire’s Leaders to establish a Treaty that formalizes your economic and social cooperation and understanding.

Doing so requires a new Diplomatic Edict and requires your envoy to attempt three Diplomacy checks using the Diplomatic Edict DC. These checks must be attempted in order (as an extreme success or failure can change the target Empire’s attitude and the difficulty of the later checks). If two or more of the checks fail, the attempt to create a Treaty fails; your Empire’s Fame decreases by 1 and you cannot attempt to establish a Treaty with the other Empire for 10 Turns.

If two or more of the checks succeed, your envoy and one of the target Empire’s Leaders (typically the Ruler or Grand Diplomat) attempt opposed checks with the following skills, rerolling ties: Bluff, Diplomacy, Culture, and Sense Motive.

Either or both parties may substitute Intimidate for Diplomacy (even if this means one party is making a Diplomacy check opposed by the other’s Intimidate check). As with Diplomatic Edicts, abilities or spells that modify skill checks do not apply unless they last at least 24 hours. Whichever party wins most of these opposed checks has the advantage in the negotiations and decides whether the Treaty is balanced or unbalanced.

For a balanced Treaty, increase each Empire’s Economy by 10% of the other country’s Economy.

The Fame of the party with the advantage in the negotiations by 1.

For an unbalanced Treaty, the advantaged Empire’s Economy increases by 15% of the disadvantaged Empire’s Economy, and the disadvantaged Empire’s Economy increases by 5% of the advantaged Empire’s Economy. The advantaged Empire’s Infamy increases by 1.

A Treaty is considered a permanent agreement.

If you want to renegotiate it, attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, your envoy and one of the target Empire’s Leaders attempt opposed checks as described for Embassies above (this doesn’t guarantee you end up with a more favorable Treaty).

If you fail, the existing Treaty remains in effect and your Unrest increases by 1.

If you withdraw from the Treaty, attempt a Loyalty check. Success means Unrest increases by 1; failure means Unrest increases by 2.

If you attack an Empire with which you have a Treaty, attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, Infamy and Unrest increase by 1 each. If you fail, Infamy and Unrest increase by 1d4 each.

Alliance: If you have a Treaty with another Empire, you can use a Diplomatic Edict to form an Alliance—a military agreement of mutual defense and support.

This works like the negotiations for a Treaty, except it requires six Diplomacy or Intimidate checks. Four of these must succeed for the Alliance to form.

If successful, negotiations proceed as for a Treaty, with three opposed Diplomacy or Intimidate checks to determine who has the advantage in negotiations.

The party with the advantage may decide whether the Alliance is balanced or unbalanced, but the bonuses apply to each Empire’s Stability instead of Economy.

Nations in an Alliance can move their armies through each others’ territories and station them in each others’ territories and Colonies. If an allied Empire stations an army inside your territory, you must succeed at a Loyalty check or gain 1d2 Unrest; this does not apply if your Empire has been attacked and you have requested aid from the ally.

If you are attacked by another Empire, you can call for aid from your allies. Failure to send aid increases an ally’s Infamy by 1d4; the precise nature and amount of aid sent is at the discretion of the rulers of each Empire, and the GM decides whether this Infamy increase happens.

If you attack an Empire with which you have an Alliance, attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, Infamy and Unrest increase by 1d4 each. If you fail, Infamy and Unrest increase by 2d4 each.

An attacked ally may end an Alliance, Treaty, or Embassy agreement with the aggressor without penalty.

Relationships with Multiple Empires

An Empire may have Embassies number of Empires. For each Treaty or Alliance after the first, the bonus to Economy or Stability is reduced by 1 (minimum +1).

Endowments

An Endowment Edict represents attention of the heads of state on matters of arts and learning. Endowing costs 100 CP times the Infrastructure’s cost in BP, which can be paid by withdrawing BP with a Withdrawal Edict, or the endowment can be paid directly by a PC or NPC from their own personal funds. Maintaining each endowed Infrastructure and its collections and staff increases the Empire’s Consumption by 1. Each Endowment Edict that you issue gives your Empire a +1 bonus to Fame and Loyalty as long as its Consumption is paid. If Consumption is not paid, these bonuses are lost and you gain 1 point of Unrest unless you succeed at a Loyalty check. Any Monument, Transit or Development Infrastructure can be sponsored with an Endowment Edict. If you capture a city from another Empire that contains one or more endowed Infrastructure, you gain a +1 bonus to Fame but no bonus to Loyalty for each Infrastructure as long as you pay their Consumption. Alternatively, you may destroy the endowed Infrastructure of your enemy, gaining 2 points of Infamy for each endowed one you destroy. If you roll the Tribute Empire Event, you can treat that as an Endowment Edict, having the patrons endow a piece of Infrastructure in their name and paying both the up-front cost and the ongoing Consumption.

with any the focused Infrastructure

Espionage

While relations between Empires may be friendly, often one Empire wants to know more about what is happening in another’s territory and business than their rivals might want to reveal. Espionage Edicts are used by one Empire to uncover confidential information about other Empires and their Leaders, or factions and power groups within them, and sometimes to use that information aggressively to foment unrest and spread sedition within that Empire. The success of an Espionage Edict is determined by Economy, Loyalty, and Stability checks, with the DC calculated as follows: DC = Control DC + Law Score + Difficulty Modifier – the amount of BP spent on the Espionage Edict (minimum 2).

The Law Score used in this DC is generally the law score of the Colony where espionage is taking place.

If another Empire is being investigated, use that Empire’s capital.

If all three checks are successful, the mission is a great success and the PCs’ Empire gains two pieces of information from the category below, or their espionage has double the listed effect. If two checks succeed, the mission meets its objectives, acquiring the desired piece of information or having the desired effect. If only one check succeeds, the mission fails. If all three checks fail, the mission fails and your spies are caught (see below). In addition, if any check results in a natural 1, your spies are caught even if the mission succeeds.

Gather Public Information (DC -5): Obtain a list of all Infrastructure in one Colony; the location and size of all Colonies in the target Empire; the target Empire’s size, borders, and major landforms and bodies of water (any terrain that occupies three or more contiguous Sectors); the names of the target Empire’s Leaders.

Discover Minor Secrets (DC +0): Obtain a list of Embassies, Treaties, and Allies of an Empire; a list of Trade Routes (type and destination) in that Empire; the Colony Alignment, Government, Qualities, Statistics, and Disadvantages of a Colony; the location of terrain improvements, Landmarks, and Special Resources in the target Empire; the level of Unrest in the target Empire; or uncover minor trade secrets that grant your Empire a +1d2 bonus to Economy for 1d4 Turns(doubled if you have a Treaty or Trade Route with the target Empire).

Discover Major Secrets (DC +10): Obtain a list of armies located in a Colony; discover the attitude of the Empire toward other countries; discover the character classes of the target Empire’s Leaders; discover the target Empire’s current Economy, Loyalty, and Stability modifiers, as well as its Empire-wide Capability, Culture, Law, and Supply modifiers; obtain significant trade secrets providing your Empire with a +1d4 bonus to Economy for 2d4 Turns (doubled if you have a Treaty or Trade Route with the target Empire).

Discover Vital Secrets (DC +20): Discover the CR and alignment of Empire Leaders; discover the most valuable or powerful equipment of 1d4 Empire Leaders; discover the location of all of the target Empire’s armies; discover secret ways into or out a fortified Colony, allowing your armies to ignore half of the total Defense value (rounded down) of that infrastructure; obtain major trade secrets granting your Empire a +2d4 bonus to Economy for 2d6 Turns (doubled if you have a Treaty or Trade Route with the target Empire).

Bribe Mercenaries (DC +0 to demoralize, DC +5 for desertion, +10 for treason; these DC modifiers are doubled if your Empire is at war with the mercenaries’ present employer): The target mercenary army loses 1d3 points of Morale (sap morale), deserts their present employer and flees (desertion), or switches sides to join your armies (treason). Using this type of Espionage Edict requires a cash bribe of 1000 cp times the army’s AR.

Foment Unrest (DC +5): Your spies add 1d3 Unrest in the target Empire.

Organize Crime Spree (DC +5): Your agents reduce Economy by 1 and decrease Law by 2 in the target Empire, which also loses 1d6 BP from its Treasury.

Sabotage Infrastructure (DC +15): Your saboteurs damage one piece of Infrastructure, rendering it nonfunctional until repaired at half the Infrastructure cost. If you achieve complete success with three successful checks for this Espionage Edict, you may choose to damage two Infrastructures or completely destroy one. This has no effect on Infrastructure that provides a Defense bonus.

Spread Rumor and Scandal (DC +5): Your agents start a whispering campaign that breeds mistrust and gossip, reducing Loyalty and Culture by 1 and also decreasing the target Empire’s Fame or increasing its Infamy by 1. If your spies are caught, your Empire must succeed at a Loyalty check, which is adjusted by all modifiers listed above that applied to the Espionage Edict you attempted. If the Loyalty check succeeds, your spy is imprisoned or executed but does not reveal your involvement. If the Loyalty check fails, the spy breaks under questioning and tells who sent him and why. This revelation increases your Empire’s Infamy by 1, decreases your Loyalty by 1, and causes you to gain 1 point of Unrest. In addition, the target Empire (or other similar group) has its 42 attitude towards you shifted by one step in a negative direction for 10 Turns. Likewise, citizens of the target Empire have their attitude shifted towards any PC or NPC affiliated with the government of your Empire adjusted negatively by one step. If the target Empire is one with whom you have an Embassy, Treaty, or Alliance, the above modifiers are doubled and you lose 1d4 points of Fame and must make one Loyalty check each for your Embassy, Treaty, and Alliance. Each failed check causes your Empire to lose 1 additional point of Fame and cancels your highest Diplomatic Edict with that country. Hence, if you are caught spying upon a country with whom you have an Alliance, one failed check reduces your relationship to a Treaty, two failed checks to an Embassy, and three failed checks causes that Empire to sever all Diplomatic relations with your Empire).

Exploration

In a typical Starfinder Roleplaying Game campaign, exploration is part of what your PCs do in the course of the game. Of course, their exploration can continue at the adventuring party level, but as rulers of an empire they also can send others to do exploration for them on behalf of the empire with an Exploration Edict. Such edicts allow you to commission explorers to map unclaimed Sectors and prepare them for your Empire. You may choose to accompany the explorers or let them explore on their own.

When commissioning an expedition, you must determine the length of time and plan the route in advance. Financing explorers costs 2 BP per Turn of the expedition, paid in advance. The explorers start in one of your Colonies, and spend the agreed-on time traveling to, exploring, and mapping unclaimed Sectors. At the end of the contracted period, they return to your Empire. See the Founding a Colony rules for travel and exploration times. Each expedition requires a separate Exploration Edict.

Explorers note obvious terrain features and resources on the first Moment in a Sector. Each Moment spent in the Sector allows Physical Science and/or Survival checks to locate hidden landmarks, lairs, or resources, with a DC ranging from 15 for things that are relatively easy to find or well known in local lore to DC 30 for those that are well hidden or generally unknown.

Explorers have the same chances for random encounters and other dangers that you would if you traveled through or explored the Sector yourself. If you are not traveling with the explorers and they have a hostile encounter, you may attempt a Stability check (DC = Control DC + twice the encounter’s CR).

If you succeed at the Stability check, the explorers triumph and can continue exploring. If you fail by 5 or less, the explorers escape and survive but are temporarily scattered and make no more progress that Turn. If you fail the Stability check by more than 5, the explorers are killed; Unrest increases by 1, and the remainder of your BP investment in the expedition is lost.

Fame and Infamy

Nations gain notoriety for the actions of their Leaders and citizens, as well as for constructing certain types of Infrastructure. This leads to the development of Fame or Infamy. Fame represents a positive perception of an Empire—it’s seen as a place of Culture, learning, peace, and honor—as well as reflecting its measure of success in diplomacy, trade, and battle. Infamy represents a negative perception of an Empire—it’s perceived as treacherous, corrupt, prejudiced, ruthlessly warmongering, and villainous.

As an Empire grows, it can gain and lose both Fame and Infamy, but these are not opposite statistics—an increase in Fame does not mean an equal decrease in Infamy. For example, an Empire may be famous for Culture and learning as well as infamous for treachery and corruption.

Starting Values: When you found an Empire, it starts with Fame 1 or Infamy 1 (Ruler’s choice). The other value starts at 0. Fame and Infamy cannot go below 0.

Colony Modifiers: For every level 3 or 4 Infrastructure you possess in any of your Colonies, you may have either fame or infamy increase by 1.

For every level 5 Infrastructure you possess, you may have either fame or infamy increase 2.

Size Increases: When your Empire’s Size increases to 11, 26, 51, 101, 201, and any value afterwards ending in 01, Fame or Infamy (Ruler’s choice) increases by 1.

Using Fame and Infamy: Fame and Infamy affect skill checks relating to other Empires. For every 10 points of your Empire’s Fame, your citizens gain a +1 bonus on Diplomacy checks to influence government officials of other Empires. For every 10 points of your Empire’s Infamy, your citizens gain a +1 bonus on Intimidate checks to influence government officials of other Empires.

Festival Edicts

A Festival Edict is a special Edict distinct from the broader Holiday Edict. Whereas a Holiday Edict declares days to celebrate on the calendar across the length and breadth of your Empire, a Festival Edict is a specific, one-time Event (though it could be repeated later) focused in a particular place at a particular time for a particular purpose.

A festival takes place in a specific Colony, and costs 1d6 BP per District in that Colony. A successful Festival Edict increases all bonuses granted from Monument and Commerce Infrastructure based upon the success of the Edict.

When you issue a Festival Edict, make Economy, Loyalty, and Stability checks. If all three succeed, the Festival is a resounding success, doubling the effects of the Infrastructure listed above for one Turn; in addition, you gain the benefits of an Outstanding Success (01-50), Visiting Celebrity (51-95), or both (96-00) Empire Events. If two checks succeed, the Festival is a modest success, increasing the effects of the listed buildings by 50% for one Turn. Total the bonuses for all listed buildings in the Colony together before applying the 50% increase, rounding down; do not apply the 50% increase separately to each building. When buildings effects are increased (whether doubled or by 50%), this increase includes not only Empire and Colony attribute modifiers like Supply and Culture. If only one check succeeds, the Festival is unsuccessful and grants no benefits; in addition, there is a 50% chance that disgruntled citizens issue a Building Demand (as the Empire Event), blaming the lack of success on the absence (or presence, if they demand demolition) of that building. If all three checks fail, the Festival is a disaster, providing no benefits. The Empire loses 1 point of Fame and gains 1d4-1 points of Unrest, and disaffected locals bankrupted by the festival and lingering troublemakers in the wake of the festival become Squatters (01-50), Vandals (51-95), or both (96-00), triggering Empire Events of the appropriate type. A natural 1 is always a failure on any Empire roll, and each time you roll a natural 1 on any of the three Empire checks to determine the success of the Festival Edict there is a 25% non-cumulative chance of triggering a dangerous Colony Event. This Event may be of any type, but only one such Event can be triggered, even if you roll more than one natural 1.

During any Turn when a Festival Edict is issued, the entire Empire takes a -2 Stability penalty, and any Stability checks required for the Colony or Sector where the Festival is held take a -4 penalty (this does not apply to the Stability check to determine 44 the success of the festival, but it does apply to any Empire Events triggered by the festival).

Gaining Experience For Leadership

You can run this system and that side of the campaign as completely independent from the party’s normal adventuring careers, but it makes much more sense for integrating this side of their characters’ lives with the rest of what they do if they also earn experience points for ruling and managing their empire. Certainly, it is a place for them to rise up and grow in stature and prominence, and it only makes sense to allow the experience they gain in this realm to enhance their skill and advancement in all that they do. As the Empire grows, the party gains experience points the first time it reaches each of the following milestones.

Action XP Award
Found an Empire 2,400 XP
Establish a Capital 1,200 XP
Reach an Empire Size of 11 2,400 XP
Reach an Empire Size of 26 4,800 XP
Reach an Empire Size of 51 9,600 XP
Reach an Empire Size of 101 12,800 XP
Reach an Empire Size of 151 25,600 XP
Reach an Empire Size of 201 76,800 XP
Fill a Colony with 4 Modules of Infrastructure 1,600 XP
Fill a Colony with 16 Modules of Infrastructure 4,800 XP
Fill a Colony with 36 Modules of Infrastructure 12,800 XP

Independence and Unification

Sometimes, breaking an Empire into multiple pieces or joining with another Empire is the best option for long-term survival.

Declaring Independence

Though many Empires break apart due to military, racial, or religious conflicts, you can divide up your Empire amiably if all Leaders agree. During the Event Phase, follow these steps.

Step 1: Decide how many Empires you’ll make out of the old one.

Step 2: Split up the Empire. Determine which Sectors belong to each child Empire. Divide the treasury in a fair manner (such as proportionate to population or Size) and divide any other mobile assets (such as armies).

Step 3: Determine how much Unrest in the parent Empire does not result from Leadership and Infrastructure modifiers. Divide this by the number of child Empires being made from the parent Empire (minimum 1 Unrest).

Step 4: Each child Empire should follow the steps for founding an Empire. Treat Leaders moving from the parent Empire to a child Empire as abdicating their posts in the parent Empire. Loyalty increases by 1 for each child Empire for the next 5 Turns. Add the Unrest from Step 3 to the Unrest for the child Empires.

The GM may influence any of these steps as appropriate to the situation, such as by giving one Empire an Economy penalty and a Loyalty bonus or dividing the Unrest in Step 4 unequally between the Empires. If independence occurs as a result of creating a secondary territory by losing control of a connecting Sector (see Losing Sectors), the additional Unrest penalty from having an Empire Leader act as the Ruler ends.

Independence and Diplomatic Edicts

If you’re using Diplomatic Edicts, you may wish to use such an Edict to declare independence. Treat this act as a Diplomatic Edict to form an Alliance, but the sponsor’s initial attitude toward your Empire is 2 steps worse.

If successful, the negotiation emancipates your Empire and ends any Treaty or Alliance with your former patron; you retain an Embassy with that Empire and can try to negotiate a new Treaty or Alliance. If the negotiation fails, it worsens the patron’s attitude by 1 additional step. If this changes the patron’s attitude to hostile, it leads to war against your rebellious Empire.

The paragraph above describes an optimal, peaceful situation where part of the Empire wants to split away from the rest or the rulers want to divide the Empire into smaller Empires. Splitting a country because of invasion, revolution, or a similar conflict usually involves unique circumstances and is beyond the scope of these rules; the GM should use the above steps as guidelines for when the Empire Leaders reach an agreement with others about how to split the Empire.

Forming a Union

Just as an Empire can divide into separate pieces, Empires may want to Sectore to become a more powerful political entity. If the Leaders in each Empire agree to the union, the process is relatively smooth. During the Event Phase, follow these steps.

First, combine the Treasuries and any other mobile assets (such as armies) of the Empires.

Next, determine how much Unrest in each Empire is not from Leadership and Infrastructure modifiers.

Average these numbers together (minimum 1 Unrest).

Then follow the steps for founding an Empire.

Treat Leaders who change roles as changing roles within the same Empire.

Once you’ve got your new, combined Empire, add the Unrest from earlier to the Unrest for the new Empire.

The GM may influence any of these steps as appropriate to the situation, such as giving Sectors in the smaller Empire a temporary Loyalty penalty for 10 Turns, or giving the entire Empire a 1d4–2 Stability modifier each Turn for 5 Turns.

Trade

Your empire can conduct trade with other empires, whether your Empire is a planetary nation sending goods by land, air, and sea, or an interstellar network sending shipments through hyperspace. You can use a Trade Edict to create a trade route with another Empire, increasing the BP you gain every Turn, as well as possibly increasing your Fame and other Empire statistics.

To plan a trade route, select another Empire as your trade partner and determine the distance in Sectors from a Colony in your Empire to a Colony in the target Empire, tracing the path of the trade route rather than a direct line. a trade route can pass through flatland, dunes, wasteland, vacuum of space, water, underwater, or any terrain that has a road or highway.

Longer trade routes are harder to maintain than short ones. To determine the effective length of your trade route, add together the number of moments of exploration time needed to traverse each Sector along the way. This is the Trade Route Length (TRL).

Divide the Trade Route Length by 10 to get the Route Modifier (RM). Subtract the TRL from your Empire’s Size to get the Length Modifier (LM), with a minimum LM of 0.

Establishing a trade route takes 1 Turn. You must invest at least 5 BP into the initial trade expedition using this trade route. The first time your traders reach the destination Colony, attempt an Economy check, a Loyalty check, and a Stability check.

Determine the DC as follows: DC = Control DC + the RM + the LM – the number of BP spent provisioning the expedition If all three checks fail, the trade route is a total loss; Fame decreases by 1 and Unrest increases by 1. If one check succeeds, the expedition fails to reach its destination but sells its goods elsewhere for 1d4 BP per every 5 BP invested.

If two checks succeed, the trade route is established; Economy increases by 1 and Treasury increases by the RM + 2d4 BP per 5 BP invested in the initial trade expedition. For example, if you invested 5 BP in a trade route with an RM of 2, Treasury increases by 2 + 2d4 BP.

If all three checks succeed, the trade route is established and is a great success; Economy increases by 2, Fame increases by 1, and Treasury increases by the RM + 2d4 BP per 5 BP invested in the initial trade expedition.

An established trade route provides its benefits for 10 Turns.

An Empire can have one of each of the following types of trade route. Each type requires certain Infrastructure in your Colony, and each increases the Economy bonus from a successful trade route.

Food: If your Empire has surplus production that reduces its Consumption to below 0, you may export food. A successful Food trade route increases Economy by 1 for every 10 Modules filled with Agriculture Infrastructure in the Empire; this benefit is lost in any Turn that this Infrastructure does not reduce Consumption below 0.

Goods: The trade route transports goods such as weapons and clothing. Count all Modules filled with Development Infrastructure in the Empire and divide by 10; a successful Goods trade route increases Economy by this amount.

Raw Materials: This trade route carries common raw materials such as lumber, stone, ore, or metal.

A successful Raw Materials trade route increases Economy by 1 for every 10 Modules filled with Extraction Infrastructure in the Empire.

Vassal States

Sometimes you may not wish to absorb new territories into your empire directly, instead establishing a permanent relationship with a smaller state that is under your indirect control, ruled by a proxy you select who ensures your interests are served. A Vassalage Edict allows you to cede a portion of your Empire (or unclaimed territory you deem yours to take) to a subordinate Leader, sponsoring that Leader’s rulership in exchange for fealty. You can also use a Vassalage Edict to establish a colony beholden to your Empire. You may also use a Vassalage Edict to subjugate an existing Empire you have conquered without having to absorb the entire Empire Sector by Sector. When you issue a Vassalage Edict, you must select a person to take the Viceroy Leadership Role.

Issuing a Vassalage Edict requires you to spend 1d4 BP and give additional BP to the Viceroy as a starting Treasury for the vassal Empire (just as a wealthy sponsor may have granted to your initial Treasury). You may give up to 1/4 of your Empire’s Treasury to your new vassal as a grant to help found the Empire.

When you issue a Vassalage Edict, you are creating a new Empire or attaching an existing Empire to your own. Your vassal functions in most respects as a separate entity with its own Empire scores. You decide how it is governed; you may give its Leaders full autonomy, or give occasional suggestions or commands about Infrastructure, or control it directly by giving orders to the Viceroy.

New Vassal or Colony: When you issue a Vassalage Edict to create a new colony or Empire, you may immediately establish an Embassy, Treaty, or Alliance (your choice) with your new vassal (see Diplomatic Edicts). You may decide that the Treaty and Alliance are balanced or unbalanced. These decisions are automatically successful and do not require rolls.

Subjugation: When you issue this Edict to subjugate another Empire, you may immediately establish an Embassy, but you must follow the normal rules if you wish to establish a Treaty or Alliance. If you spend BP on bribes or gifts to reduce the DC and you succeed at forming the Treaty or Alliance, you may count half of this amount as going toward new Infrastructure built in the vassal Empire that Turn.

The starting attitude of the vassal Empire is based on alignment compatibility (as per Diplomatic Edicts) and modified by the circumstances under which you deposed the prior Leadership per GM discretion—for example, improving if you removed a hated tyrant or worsening if you unseated a popular ruler.

Subjugation may cause friction between your established citizens and the newly conquered. You must attempt a Loyalty check each Turn (when you issue the Edict, and on future Turns during the Upkeep Phase), increasing the DC by the subjugated Empire’s Size divided by 5. Failure means Unrest increases by 1d4. If you succeed at this check three Turns in a row, you establish a peaceful equilibrium and no longer need to attempt these checks.

Vacancy Penalty: If the vassal Empire take a Vacancy penalty for not having a Viceroy or a Viceroy not doing his duties, that Empire also takes the Ruler Vacancy penalty. A Consort or Heir from your Empire may mitigate this penalty if she is touring the vassal state; however, she cannot also mitigate the Ruler Vacancy penalty in your Empire.

Withdrawal Edicts

The wealth of an Empire is great, as is the power it can lend an individual, but sometimes a Leader may wish to pull from their Empire’s coffers for their own use.

Once per Turn, a Leader may withdraw BP from the Empire’s treasury and convert it into CP, gaining 2,000 CP per point of BP taken. Each time you withdraw BP for your personal use, Unrest increases by the number of BP withdrawn.

Exploration and Setting Generation

In addition to empire-building, many of the rules above can be used for forging new paths across the universe, exploring and charting countries, planets, or systems. These rules for sandbox-style exploration may pique the interest of players who are especially enamored with the idea of seeking out new life and new frontiers. Of course, exploration rules can also be used in conjunction with Empire-building rules to better develop the process of Colony and expansion.

Travel

The time it takes to fully explore a Sector is determined by its terrain (see Terrain Statistics).

This time is indicative of how long it takes to fully explore, understand, and chart out the territory. If the party wishes to simply move through, divide this time in half. The simplest method of tracking the PCs’ progress as they travel and survey the setting is to do so on hex paper (if they are exploring hex-shaped Sectors. Larger Sectors should be tracked by planet or celestial body). As the PCs explore a Sector, the players should note their progress by placing a small ” X ” in the Sector. Tracking which Sectors are fully explored is important for determining exploration rewards.

Whenever a Sector is explored fully, the party earns 400 XP for the effort. Some modifiers can add to this amount. The party gains an additional 100 XP after fully exploring a Sector that contains either difficult terrain or a hazard. You might decide that some Sectors are more dangerous, especially in a higher-level campaign, and award the party more XP per Sector (perhaps up to 1000 XP for especially hostile areas).

Keeping Things Interesting

When the players ask what they find while exploring a Sector, the answer should never be “nothing.” Even in the simplest field, offer a bit of detail—something compelling to help flesh out the world. The ruins of some ancient civilization or a quarry filled with exotic materials can make an area more unique and engaging.

Exploring PCs have very few opportunities to resupply. Acquiring food and finding shelter against the elements is paramount, and losing supplies has a crippling effect on the party, as they have to hunt and forage just to acquire enough food and water to survive another day. An exploration encounter can be driven by complications like these, where every meal foraged is a victory in itself.

Remember that adventuring is more about glory than grim survival, so it’s best to keep a balance between realistic exploration issues (such as obtaining fresh food and water) and fun, exciting encounters. If you make exploration both dangerous and rewarding, the players will remain eager to keep striking out into the great unknown.

Random Encounters

Natural disasters can occur anywhere. Untamed regions are often home to a wide variety of creatures.

You can instill a bit of additional danger into your exploration sessions by including random encounters, whether they take the form of natural hazards or beings that dwell in the Sector.

Roll on the following table once per day (or once per Sector, if the PCs enter multiple Sectors in a single day). In most cases the PCs face off against a creature or hazard appropriate to the terrain, but a nearby famine, drought, war, or plague may force creatures out of its normal territory and into a strange environment.

Table 7-1: Random Encounters
d% Encounter
1-35 None
36-60 Hazard
61-100 Creature encounter

Planned Encounters

A specific, planned encounter for a Sector does not have to be especially complicated. It can be as simple as a quick meeting with an explorer who can sell the PCs some necessary supplies or the discovery of a monster lair that hints at a greater threat. a good rule when determining the number of planned encounters to prepare is to have at least one for each character in the party. That way, you can tailor encounters to allow each character to take the spotlight without having to populate every single Sector on the map one by one.

After creating these encounters, choose a Sector on the map and note that an encounter occurs there.

When the party draws closer to a Sector with a planned encounter, foreshadow it with appropriate details. For example, if you plan to have the party discover a battle between two Empires, the nearby Sectors should contain signs of an army’s passage— masses of footprints, piles of refuse, and even the graves of fallen soldiers give your players clues about 49 the impending encounter.

A few encounter sites are landmarks immediately obvious or visible with just a little bit of looking or scouting. a PC who enters the Sector automatically discovers the landmark. If a PC in an adjacent Sector spends an hour studying the landmark’s Sector and succeeds at a DC 10 Survival check, he discovers the landmark. When the PCs discover a landmark, note it on the landmark’s Sector.

Many encounter sites remain undiscovered unless the PCs decide to explore a Sector rather than just travel through it. By exploring the Sector, the PCs discover the site automatically. Some sites are hidden, requiring the PCs to make an appropriate skill check as they explore. The skill and its DC should depend on the nature of the site (see Terrain Generation).

Terrain Generation

For ease-of-use, the following tables were created for randomly generating Sectors and hazards for exploring parties. The terrain is intentionally generic, enabling it to be utilized in a wide variety of circumstances.

To generate a new map, begin by selecting a Sector as the starting point. Then decide the type of Topography, Biome, and atmosphere for that starting point. From that point onward, the reins of exploration are in your players’ hands. Let them decide which direction they travel, and let each player take a Turn generating the next Sector by rolling 1d12 three or four times (depending on whether or not they are rolling for atmosphere) to determine the terrain type and terrain element for that Sector using the tables below. If the party is exploring a new planetoid with each Sector, the should roll for atmosphere each time. Elsewise, they should not, assuming atmosphere is generally consistent across planetoids.

Table 7-2: Random Topography
d12 Topography Survival DC
1 Dunes 25
2 Hills 20
3 Ice 25
4 Mountains 25
5 Flatland 15
6 Underground 20
7 Underwater 15
8 Void of Space 30
9 Wasteland 30
10 Water 20
11 Wetland 15
12 As previous Sector
Table 7-3: Random Biome
d12 Biome Survival DC Modifier
1-2 Desolate +10
3-4 Sparse +5
5-8 Baseline
9-10 Abundant -5
11-12 Overflowing -10
Table 7-4: Random Atmosphere
d12 Atmosphere Survival DC Modifier
1-3 Airless -4
4-6 Thin -2
7-9 Normal
10-12 Hostile +2
Table 7-5: Random Terrain Elements
d12 Element
1 Difficulty
2-3 Feature
4-5 Threat
6-7 Resource
8-9 Colony
10-11 Secret
12 None

Terrain Elements

The following are random elements which can be found in an unexplored Sector. If the GM wishes, they can have players roll on this table multiple times.

Difficulty: The environment proves unusually treacherous for some reason. All skill checks involving movement and exploration have their DC increased by 5, and other environmental threats such as storms, landslides, etc. may occur while the party is exploring.

Feature: Something about the environment is unique, perhaps because it is the sole habitat of a rare species, a strange geological formation with unusual materials, or a ruin of some deceased civilization.

Threat: Some unusually powerful or aggressive creatures dwell in the area. Increase the CR of encounters by 1 either by buffing creatures or adding more of them.

Resource: Something valuable can be found in the Sector, be it some exotic material, strange herb, or something else useful.

Colony: The Sector is already settled by some group. Roll for random Colony generation (see Colony Generation) to determine what it is.

Secret: Although it will take some exploring, the Sector is privy to some valuable secret, perhaps the remnants of those who have traversed it before or some yet-unearthed treasure.

Colony and Empire Generation

Creating Colonies is difficult for many GMs, and players may attempt to expand their Empires in ways which can catch a GM off guard. The rules below enable for the easy creation of Empires and Colonies.

Creating an Empire

The first thing to do when creating an Empire is determine its ethos. Roll twice on the table below to determine the ethos of the Empire, dropping any repeat results except “none”. If two traits would be opposed or the second trait is the same as the first, treat the Empire’s ethos as only having one trait.

Alternatively, the GM can declare the Empire has a certain Ethos.

Table 7-6: Ethos Generation
d10 Trait
1 Authoritarian
2 Collectivist
3 Individualist
4 Libertarian
5 Materialist
6 Militarist
7 Pacifist
8 Spiritualist
9 Xenophobic
10 Xenophilic

To determine the size of the Empire, roll a d% and use the result as the Empire’s size in Sectors (for generating smaller Empires, one may instead want to use a d20 or even d10). The Empire’s economy, Loyalty, and stability scores are equal to its size x5 +1d20 (roll independently for each score), with Consumption equal to its size + 1d6-3 and a control DC of 10 + 5 x the Empire’s size + 1d10, a treasury equal to 1/4th the Empire’s economy score, and an unrest of 4d6-4. Points may be subtracted from economy, Loyalty, or stability to either reduce unrest by 1 or every 2 points subtracted or increasing either economy, Loyalty, or stability by 1 for every point subtracted from another one of the scores. For fame and infamy, roll 1d10 and add the Empire’s size. An Empire should have at least one Colony for every Sector it controls, and one Colony should be the Empire’s capital (roll randomly to determine which one).

A newly created Empire takes Empire Turns as normal, or at the discretion of the GM can take simplified actions or no actions at all, simply maintaining its present state without party interference (this makes things easy but renders the game world static and is hence inadvisable).

Creating a Colony

For a Colony, the first thing to determine is the Colony’s alignment, rolling twice and rerolling for any repeated or opposed results other than neutral.

Table 7-6: Colony Alignment
d6 Alignment
1 Good
2 Chaotic
3 Lawful
4 Evil
5-6 Neutral

Second, determine the Colony’s level by rolling a D20 and using the result as the Colony’s level.

The Colony’s scores (Capability, Culture, Law, and Supply) are equal to the Colony’s level, although the Colony gains an additional pool of points equal to twice its level which it can put towards increasing one or more of the Colony scores (each point invested increases a single score by one). In addition, the Colony can reduce certain scores to increase others, reducing a single score by 2 to increase another by 1.

Category Boons are not necessary for randomly generated Colonies, but if a GM wishes they may dole out category boons to the Empire with a value equal to twice the Colony’s level in Modules.

Finally, check the Empire’s Culture score and use that to determine how many different species and classes exist in the Colony. If the Colony’s Culture is 1 or 0, one race and class should be selected.

Sample Empires and Colonies

The following Empires and Colonies were generated using the rules above.

Sample Empires

Verdant Empire of Uvqoha

Xenophobic Pacifist
Empire Size: 6
Economy: 38 Loyalty: 43 Stability: 43
Control DC: 42 Unrest: 4
Treasury: 9 BP Consumption: 6
Fame: 16 Infamy: 12

Roau, Confederacy of Mercenaries

Militarist Materialist Libertarian
Empire Size: 21
Economy: 114 Loyalty: 130 Stability: 108
Control DC: 125 Unrest: 11
Treasury: 28 Consumption: 20
Fame: 28 Infamy: 30

Starlit Commonwealth of Jandekay

Authoritarian Xenophobic Collectivist
Empire Size: 69
Economy: 348 Loyalty: 362 Stability: 357
Control DC: 356 Unrest: 8
Treasury: 85 BP Consumption: 68
Fame: 70 Infamy: 79

Gleaming Empire of Ihp

Militarist
Empire Size: 80
Economy: 419 Loyalty: 406 Stability: 417
Control DC: 416 Unrest: 9
Treasury: 103 BP Consumption: 82
Fame: 86 Infamy: 84

Sample Colonies

Jyshim, Galactic Outpost Level 4

Capability: 4 Culture: 6 Law: 4 Supply: 6
Defense: +0
Races: Human, Vesk, Ysoki, Shirren
Classes: Envoy, Operative, Mechanic

Wiersranqt, Stellar Monastery Level 3

Capability: 8 Culture: 4 Law: 3 Supply: 1
Defense: +1
Races: Human, Kasatha, Lashunta
Classes: Mystic, Solarian, Operative

Ehoi Patrad, Cosmic Metropolis Level 18

Capability: 22 Culture: 36 Law: 20 Supply: 26
Defense: +4
Races: Human, Android, Ysoki, Shirren, Kasatha, Vesk, Lashunta, Space Goblin, Skittermander, Dwarves, Elves, Gnomes, Drow, Ikeshti, Dragonkin, Halflings, Half-Elves, Half-Orcs, Gray, Haan, Dragon, Draelik, Anacite, Orc, Sarcesian, Ryphorian, Reptoid, Maraquoi, Verthani, Witchwyrd, Wrikreechee
Classes: Envoy, Soldier, Operative, Mechanic, Solarian, Mystic, Technomancer

Canoxlu, Vesk Military Citadel Level 10

Capability: 20 Culture: 4 Law: 17 Supply: 10
Defense: +6
Races: Vesk
Classes: Soldier, Operative, Mechanic, Technomancer

Sci-Fi Warfare

As the drama of empires unfolds, the engagement of armies follows not long after. When a banner commands entire worlds, its military will not content itself with small troops of soldiers. Rather, tremendous armies will be assembled, legions of powerful and highly-trained soldiers who will storm their enemies in immense waves and will not be opposed but by similar displays of force.

If players wish to engage in a system of conflict where the individual means little, they must rethink how battles are fought and won. It is for this reason that the following rules for Mass Combat are presented. With this ruleset, GMs will easily be able to run encounters in which hundreds if not millions of combatants are engaged.

Creating an Army

Once you have enough recruits for the army you wish to create (or once you issue a Recruitment Edict to create an army, if using the standard rules), you can create an army using the following steps.

Step 1 – Determine Army Challenge Rating (ACR): An army’s Army Challenge Rating (ACR) is determined by the base CR of the creatures comprising the army, modified by the size of the army listed on Table: Army Size. Given that recruitment Edicts are made with a specific army CR determining their difficulty, developing an army requires starting with an Army CR and using the resources allocated by it to determine the army’s size and the CR of individual members.

Step 2 – Assign Leader: Each army requires a commander. The army’s record sheet should indicate the commander’s name, Charisma modifier, and Administration Bonus (AB), as well as what command boon(s) that commander possesses. A typical NPC force has 2-4 significant NPC characters (see Commanders) as Leaders; the remainder of its commanders are ordinary officers that provide no command boons. A PC commander gains a +2 bonus to the Melee Value (MV), Ranged Value (RV), and Defense Value (DV) of his army, as well as on Morale checks. A significant NPC character grants a +1 bonus to these army statistics.

Step 3 – Divisions: A full-strength army comprises a number of divisions of equal size, based upon the size of the army (see Table: Army Size). An army that is lacking one or more divisions at the beginning of a battle takes a -1 penalty to MV, RV, DV, and Morale checks per missing division. In most respects, a division has similar combat statistics to an army two sizes smaller (see Table: Army Size). All divisions in an army effectively have the same statistics, being composed of creatures of the same race, class, and level or CR.

Step 4 – Casualties: Casualties reflect how many points of damage an army can take before being defeated. The term is used here to reflect the fact that all “army hit points” lost in battle do not represent actual deaths, but rather soldiers being taken out of action in any of a number of ways. However, the term is equivalent to and interchangeable with hit points in all respects. Each division within an army can take Casualties equal to the army’s hit points divided by the number of divisions in the army before it is 54 defeated (see table: Army size). If a division is at 0 hit points, when its army leaves the battlefield, whether victorious or in retreat, that division can be healed using the normal rules. If, however, the division takes additional damage when it is already at 0 hit points, it is destroyed rather than merely being defeated. A destroyed division cannot be healed and must be replaced with reinforcements.

Step 5 – Melee Value (MV): An army’s combat prowess in melee is reflected in its MV. This is a modifier added to a d20 roll to determine the army’s chance of success, much like an individual creature’s attack bonus. Armies have a base MV equal to their ACR plus the Administration Bonus (AB) of its commander. Units directly commanded by a player character add an additional +2 bonus to MV; those commanded by a significant NPC character (see Commanders) add a +1 bonus. MV can also be modified by equipment, special abilities, command boons, tactics, fatigue, environmental conditions, and the like. For each division defeated or missing from the army’s full strength, it takes a -1 penalty to its MV.

Step 6 – Ranged Value (RV): An army’s combat prowess in ranged combat is reflected in its RV. RV functions identically to MV, except that armies that do not possess ranged weapons or other ranged attack capability cannot make ranged attacks (denoted as “RV -”). If some divisions within an army have ranged weapons and some do not, the overall unit’s RV is reduced by 1 for each division that lacks ranged weapons (including divisions that are missing or defeated).

Step 7 – Defense Value (DV): The defensive abilities of an army are reflected in its DV. This is a static number the army uses to resist attacks, much like an individual creature’s AC. Armies have a base DV equal to 10 + their ACR and their commander’s AB, adjusted by any applicable modifiers, such as those listed under MV or from a Colony’s defense. For each division defeated or missing from the army’s full strength, it takes a -1 penalty to its DV.

Step 8 – Morale: An army’s Morale reflects its fighting spirit and its skill and confidence on the battlefield. Morale checks are often required to succeed at various battlefield tactics, or to overcome special effects caused by enemy armies. A brand-new army has a Morale bonus equal to the Empire’s Loyalty modifier divided by 20 (rounding down, with a minimum of 1 and a maximum of 10), and it can increase or decrease during the course of a battle and in its aftermath, increasing with victory and falling with defeat. An army’s Morale score can never exceed 10, and if it ever drops to 0 the army disbands (see Bloodied, Defeated, Destroyed, and Disbanded Armies). An army’s Morale score modifies its Morale checks, adding the Administration Bonus of its commander and an additional +2 bonus if the commander is a PC and +1 if it is a named significant NPC character, plus any relevant modifiers. For each division missing from the army’s full strength, whether already missing before battle or defeated during a battle, the army takes a -1 penalty to its Morale checks. When a division is destroyed, its army loses 1 point of Morale and takes an additional -1 penalty to Morale checks for the duration of the current battle.

Step 9 – Movement: An army’s Movement score indicates the number of Sectors it can travel per Moment. A typical lightly armored army has a Movement score of 2, although this can be modified with army equipment.

Step 10 -Scouting: An army’s ability to notice other armies is reflected in its Scouting score (see Camouflage, Scouting, and Ambushes). This bonus is equal to the Perception modifier of the typical creatures that make up the army plus the AB of the army’s commander.

Step 11 – Camouflage: An army’s ability to evade notice by other armies is reflected in its Camouflage score. The Camouflage score (see Camouflage, Scouting, and Ambushes) of an army is equal to 10 plus the lowest Stealth modifier of the creatures comprising the army divided by 4, adding the commander’s AB bonus and applying the Camouflage modifier noted in Table 3: Army Size.

Step 12 – Consumption: This is how many Build Points (BP) an army consumes each Turn, representing the cost to feed, hydrate, arm, train, care for, and pay the army. An army’s base Consumption is equal to its ACR divided by 2 (minimum 1). If you fall behind on paying the army’s Consumption, reduce its Morale by 3; this penalty ends when you catch up on the army’s pay.

Step 13 – Tactics: Tactics represent the variations in action that the army can take in a battle. Determine what tactics the army knows (see Tactics)

Table 8-1: Army Size
Army Size Gear Cost Camouflage Army HP Divisions Army Challenge Rating (ACR)
1 n/a +10 1 x ACR 1 CR of individual creature -4
2 X .1 +8 2 x ACR 1 CR of individual creature -2
3 X .25 +6 3 x ACR 3 CR of individual creature
4 X .5 +4 4 x ACR 4 CR of individual creature +2
5 X .75 +2 5 x ACR 5 CR of individual creature +4
6 X 1 +0 6 x ACR 6 CR of individual creature +6
7 X 2 -2 8 x ACR 8 CR of individual creature +8
8 X 5 -5 10 x ACR 10 CR of individual creature +10
9 X 10 -10 12 x ACR 12 CR of individual creature +12
10 X 15 -20 15 x ACR 15 CR of individual creature +15

Step 14 – Equipment: Equipment is the armaments with which an army wages war. Determine what equipment the army has by spending a certain amount of BP (see Equipping an Army). An NPC Army fielded by a rival Empire will typically have an amount of equipment with a BP value of a tenth of the Empire’s economy score.

Step 15 – Special Abilities: Many armies possess additional abilities as a result of their species and class makeup. Determine what special abilities the army has (see Special Abilities).

Step 16 – Alignment: Determine the army’s alignment. An army’s alignment has no effect on its statistics and is just a convenient way to summarize its attitude with two letters. It is usually the same alignment as a typical soldier in that army.

Step 17 – Army Name and Home Base: Each Army should have a name, which can be a simple functional title like “623rd Legion” or florid like “Sun Dragon’s Maw.” In addition, each Army should be assigned a home base, which must be a Colony, typically the Colony where the soldiers comprising the army were recruited. If an army is destroyed, that Colony gains a permanent -1 Law penalty and there is a 25% chance during the next Empire Turn’s Event Phase that the citizens of the army’s home base will cause a Building Demand Event asking that a Monument of some sort be erected in memory of the honored dead. If an army disbands, the Colony gains a -2 Law modifier but there is no chance of a Building Demand.

Forming a Force A force is simply a collection of armies all fighting in concert according to a common battle plan. A force can be named (e.g., Titanium Tide, Lords of the Green Star) or numbered (e.g., 1st Army, 2nd Army), though it may not be if an Empire has only a single force in the field. In any battle, however, a single designated character must act as the general of the force. This may be the Empire’s General, who has overall responsibility for all military activity in the Empire but just as easily could be another PC or NPC member of the Empire’s leadership team.

A General should have many ranks in Profession (soldier). The General of the force and the army commanders or other significant characters can provide a variety of Command Boons to the forces under their command. Some boons apply to an entire force, but most apply only to a single army. Each force is limited to a number of armies equal to 3 plus the General’s Intelligence, Wisdom, or Charisma modifier. The general oversees the combat from the Command Zone and does not directly participate in the battle, though she determines Strategy and Tactical Initiative during the course of the battle, with individual army commanders choosing the Tactics and Command Boons they will use to make the general’s strategy a success.

Running Mass Combat

The following rules are designed for dynamic sci-fi battles between armies of soldiers on some kind of planetary surface, though this may include a wide variety of surfaces and even low or zero-gravity environments. They do not directly integrate with the standard starship combat rules for the Starfinder Roleplaying Game, though certainly characters might engage in a starship combat en route to a battle or during the aftermath of one. More expansive fleet battle rules can be found in the Star Battles expansion coming soon from Legendary Games, as well as rules for integrating the core mass combat rules found here with an even wider variety of environments and combat situations.

Battle Zones

Any battlefield has three primary zones. These zones are abstract rather than geographic and represent where armies are in relation to one another. An army may begin a Battle Phase in the Ranged zone, but if an enemy army advances and engages them, they are now considered to be in the Melee zone even if they have not actually moved. If the army attacking them is destroyed and no other army engages them, they return to the Ranged zone. It is perhaps easiest to think of these zones as concentric circles, with the Melee zone at the center, surrounded by the Ranged zone, with the Camp zone beyond it. A line down the center of the circle divides it in half, with one army’s forces in its Melee, Ranged, and Camp zones and its enemy’s forces in theirs.

Camp Zone: This represents an army’s base of operations, which may be a temporary bivouac or a permanent fortification. Armies in the Camp zone cannot participate in a battle unless enemy armies move into the Camp zone. Generally speaking, armies cannot enter their enemy’s Camp zone as long as the enemy has active armies in the Melee or Ranged zone (but see Moving an Army).

Command Zone: This is the area where the army’s commanders direct the flow of battle. This area is generally considered part of the Camp zone and cannot be directly attacked as long as the active armies are present in the Melee and/or Ranged zones.

Ranged Zone: This represents the back lines of an army on the field, with forces either arrayed to engage in ranged combat or simply to hold in place in reserve. Armies in the Ranged zone cannot be attacked in melee.

Melee Zone: This represents the front lines of any battle, where forces meet in close and brutal combat.

Armies in the Melee zone can be attacked with melee or ranged attacks.

Strategy

At the beginning of a battle, each side must decide upon its overall strategy for the battle, not in terms of the precise maneuvers that will be used but more in terms of its philosophy about how the battle is to be conducted. Selecting a strategy applies to all armies under the general’s command. While individual armies may have their own specialized tactics that define how they carry out the overall strategy, that one overall strategy guides all of their actions on the battlefield. During each Tactical Initiative Phase, the commanding general for each side can try to alter the strategy her forces pursue, adjusting it by one step in either direction without needing to make a Morale check. A general can attempt to shift strategy to a greater degree, but this is difficult for all but the most highly trained armies, requiring a Morale check with a penalty equal to the number of steps by which strategy is being shifted. If the check fails, the army’s strategy changes one step in the desired direction, but the army is thrown into disarray for the remainder of that Battle Phase, resulting in a penalty to Offense Modifiers (OM) and Defensive Value (DV) equal to the number of steps the general attempted to shift their strategy.

Table 8-2: Battle Strategy
Type of Strategy MV and RV DV Casualties
Hold Firm -4 +4 -4
Cautious Advance -2 +2 -2
Standard
Aggressive Attack +2 -2 +2
All-Out Assault +4 -4 +4

The Casualties modifier applies to damage dealt by you and damage dealt by your enemies, including damage from failed attacks and friendly fire.

Battle Phases

Each round of a battle is split into several phases, with a typical Battle Phase taking a total of 1d6 hours.

Recon Phase: Prior to the fight, each army possesses an opportunity to gather information on the enemy with successful skill checks.

Tactical Phase: At the start a round, the overall army commander can shift the overall strategy that all forces under their command will follow. In addition, each unit commander can decide what special tactics their unit will use to implement that strategy. These choices must be made before tactical initiative is determined.

Gunnery Phase: During this Phase, any army or unit that is not engaged with an enemy force can make a ranged attack (assuming it has ranged weapons or other capabilities enabling ranged attacks to be made).

Melee Phase: During this Phase, armies move together and engage in melee combat, using a variety of special tactics to outmaneuver and destroy their opponents.

Rout Phase: After resolving ranged and melee combat for the round, each surviving unit must succeed at a Morale check to sustain its will to fight.

Recon Phase

Before the fight begins, if both forces are aware of each other, they may make Scouting checks to gather information on the enemy force, using the highest Leadership modifier of all armies under a force. The DC of this check is equal to 10 + the Leadership score of the opposing commander. On a success, the force gathering information learns one of the following pieces of information, plus an additional piece of info for every 5 by which they exceed the DC.

  • Size of one enemy army (and armies which are identical to it)
  • ACR of one enemy army (and armies which are identical to it)
  • Race and class of one enemy army (and armies which are identical to it)
  • One command boon the enemy commander is using
  • Two special abilities of one enemy army (and armies which are identical to it)
  • Equipment of one enemy army (and armies which are identical to it)
  • AB and Charisma modifier of the enemy commander Unless an unusual ambush or concealment situation exists, determining the number of armies in the opposing force is obvious to both forces and does not require a check.

Tactical Phase

The commander in charge of each force makes a Profession (soldier) check; the individual army commanders do not. Winning tactical initiative provides a bonus of +1 to MV and RV for all armies under the general’s command. The commander that wins tactical initiative selects one army to attack an enemy army (going through the melee and ranged phases), followed by the enemy selecting one army to attack in response. Attacks alternate from each commander until all armies have attacked once.

An army that is destroyed, disabled, routed, or otherwise taken out of action before it has a chance to act forfeits its attack. If one side has more armies than the other, when one side runs out of armies to attack taking Turns with its opponent, any leftover armies from the larger force attack in succession until all have attacked.

If one commander’s check exceeds his opponent’s by 5 or more, he can either force his enemy to reveal one tactic or he can change one of his own army’s tactics for every 5 points by which his check exceeds his opponent’s. The commander can choose which army he wishes to learn about; if that army has more than one tactic available, it must reveal the tactic it is using during this Battle Phase. Regardless of the result of your check, you can reveal only one tactic per enemy army or change one tactic for each of your armies; any excess is lost. Command boons and creature special abilities are not revealed by winning tactical initiative.

Gunnery Phase

During the Gunnery Phase, the armies are arrayed near one another but have not yet advanced to commence the battle in earnest. During this Phase, armies cannot attack in melee but can attack with ranged weapons or other abilities that allow them to attack at a distance. During the Gunnery Phase, each army can attack (provided it has the ability to attack at range), advance (move up to engage an enemy in close combat), or hold (remain in place, neither attacking nor advancing). An army that advances can then attack in the Melee Phase. Armies that do not advance cannot attack in the Melee Phase unless they themselves are attacked by an enemy unit that advances. Some battlefields contains impassable barriers between armies, such as a river, cliff, or even a city wall or similar fortification. In this situation, armies may be unable to advance during the Gunnery Phase unless they have some means of circumventing the barrier. An army inside a Colony does not count as having an impassable barrier between itself and enemy armies; instead, the Defense score of the Colony is considered to represent the difficulty of approaching to attack. An army stationed in a Colony may add the Colony’s Defense score to their DV.

Armies may remain at range and attack with ranged weapons, but armies using the advance action are considered to be attempting to scale the walls or otherwise assault the fortifications in such a way as to threaten the safety of the defending army. Any unit with ranged weapons or an ability that grants it a ranged attack can make a ranged attack rather than a melee attack, and all ranged attacks are resolved during the ranged Phase before proceeding the melee attacks, though some tactics provide exceptions to this rule. A unit cannot make a ranged attack if it is engaged. When a unit attacks, it picks an enemy unit as its target and rolls 1d20, adding its RV (including any modifiers). If the result equals or exceeds the DV of the target unit the attack is successful and inflicts a number of Casualties equal to the difference between your adjusted RV check and the target DV. The commander of the target unit assigns these Casualties to the divisions of his unit as he sees fit.

If your adjusted RV check fails to equal or exceed the target’s DV, the defending army takes no damage. A natural 20 always indicates a successful attack, inflicting 1d6 Casualties on the target army, regardless of its DV (use the attack’s normal damage if it exceeds the result of this roll). In addition, on a natural 20 the attacker assigns damage to the defending unit and its divisions as he wishes. On a natural 1, the attack automatically fails and the attacking unit inflicts 1d6 Casualties on itself and becomes fatigued.

When one of your armies makes a ranged attack against an enemy army that is engaged with one of your armies, it has a 25% chance of dealing 1d6-3 points of damage to the allied army regardless of whether its attack is successful. If your ranged attack roll is a natural 1, your allied army automatically takes 1d6-3 points of damage, while on a natural 20 your allied army never takes damage from friendly fire. An army taking damage from friendly fire loses 1 point of Morale.

With all attacks, the army deals a single type of damage, which may be fire, cold, or kinetic. This damage type is chosen when the army is created.

Melee Phase

Once an army has advanced upon the enemy, the Melee Phase begins. Resolving a melee attack between two units functions much like resolving a ranged attack in the Gunnery Phase, substituting MV for RV. However, melee combat is more inherently dangerous to attacker and defender alike. On a successful attack, the attacking and defending armies become engaged. More than one unit can be engaged with the same enemy unit at the same time.

If an attack fails to overcome the defender’s DV, both the attacking unit and the defending unit take 1d6 Casualties; these Casualties are not modified by any tactics, special attacks, or command boons used by either side, unless they explicitly state otherwise).

After resolving all attacks for their armies, each force proceeds to the Rout Phase described below, and as long as at least one army on each side survives without being routed, the battle enters a new round, with a new check to determine Tactical Initiative, as described in the Tactics Phase above.

Rout Phase

After resolving all attacks each army proceeds to the Rout Phase, with each surviving army making a Morale check with a DC of 10 plus 1 for each allied army that has been destroyed or routed from the field. If this check succeeds, the army may continue the fight undaunted. If the check fails, the army’s Morale score is reduced by 1d4. If this reduces the army’s Morale to zero, you must make a Loyalty check. If successful, the army remains intact with its Morale reset to 1 and the army routs, fleeing from the battlefield. If the Loyalty check fails, the army disbands. A cumulative -5 penalty applies to each Loyalty check for this purpose after the first that each side makes during a battle. A routed army is forced to flee the battlefield and cannot attack. Any one army engaged with it can make a free Standard or Volley attack against the routing army.

After this attack is resolved, the army’s commander must make an opposed Profession (soldier) check with a -4 penalty against the commander of the engaged army that made the attack, with each commander adding the speed of each of his armies to this roll (making it advantageous to use cavalry or other fast armies to attack routing armies). If the fleeing army wins the check, it is able to disengage and escape from the battlefield to its Camp zone. If the enemy army’s check is higher, the routing army disengages but is forced to remain on the battlefield in the Ranged zone.

At the end of any Rout Phase, a commander can sound a general retreat, ordering all of his armies to fall back and leave the battlefield. This functions like the Retreat tactic but can be performed even by armies that have already attacked in the Battle Phase; however, retreating armies take an additional -2 penalty to their Morale check to disengage from enemy armies. In addition, when a General Retreat is ordered, any enemy army that is not engaged with one of your retreating armies can make one Volley ranged attack against any retreating army of its choice. When a mercenary army’s Morale drops to 1, or when they have lost more than half of their hit points, they must make a Morale check to avoid routing. An Empire takes no penalties when a mercenary army disbands or is destroyed.

Bloodied, Defeated, Destroyed, and Disbanded Armies

In battle, armies almost never fight until the last soldier is killed. While iconic, this is simply not a normal reality of warfare. When one army is clearly beaten and its cause is lost, it loses the will and the ability to fight long before the point of annihilation.

Bloodied Armies: An army that is reduced below half its hit points during any battle, whether its side is ultimately victorious or not, becomes bloodied.

A bloodied army has lost a substantial number of its soldiers to death or permanent injury, and no amount of rest, recovery, or healing can bring the unit up to its full fighting strength. A bloodied army is treated as though its ACR is 1 less than normal for all purposes. This reduction applies each time it has been bloodied, and the effects stack for the purpose of determining the unit’s MV, RV, DV, maximum hit points, and all other game effects except the army’s Consumption. The bloodied condition can be removed only by replenishing the army with new recruits (see Reinforcements and Reformation).

Defeated Armies: An army reduced to 0 hit points is defeated and can take no further actions in the battle, but it can be taken prisoner or massacred by its enemies following the battle, attacked in spite of their surrender in the midst of battle, or recovered, reformed, and restored to fighting strength by its allies after the battle ends (see Victory and Aftermath). A defeated army typically has 10% of its number dead, and 1d4 x 10% of its number wounded and unable to fight, the rest simply too physically exhausted or emotionally shaken to continue fighting.

Destroyed Armies: If a defeated army is attacked before the battle ends, it takes a -2 penalty to its DV. If successfully attacked by an enemy army of at least half its size, the defeated army is instead destroyed and ceases to exist as a fighting force. In a destroyed unit, the dead number 1d6 x 10% of the army’s soldiers, with 1d4 x 10% wounded, and the remainder simply surrendered or deserted. When an army is destroyed, the country for which it fought loses 1 point of Fame. In addition, there is a 25% chance that the city where the army was recruited (with an Improvement or Recruitment Edict) has a Building Demand Event during the next Empire Turn, demanding a Monument to be erected as a memorial to the fallen. This is in addition to any other Empire Events that may occur.

Disbanded Armies: When an army is reduced to 0 Morale and fails a Loyalty check, it not only routs from the battlefield but actually ceases to exist as a fighting force, disintegrating in a combination of flight and surrender. When an army disbands, 50% of its number is permanently deducted from the Empire’s population, as those soldiers desert their country and flee for safer lands where their shame will not follow them. The other 50% of the soldiers 61 filter back into the population of their Empire. When an army disbands, all allied armies take a -1 penalty to Morale checks for the remainder of the battle; this stacks if more than one army disbands. When an army disbands, the Empire for which it fights takes a permanent -1 penalty to Fame, Loyalty, and Stability and the Colony where the army was recruited (with an Improvement or Recruitment Edict) takes a permanent -2 penalty to Law. If an army disbands while you are at war (rather than, for example, disbanding because of lack of pay or training during peacetime), your enemy gains a one-time reduction in its Consumption for any one unit within one Sector of the disbanded army equal to 1/2 the disbanded army’s ACR; if this amount exceeds your army’s Consumption, any excess is lost. However, if you use a Recruitment Edict to create a new army in a Colony within 3 Sectors of the site of the enemy army’s desertion, you gain a one-time bonus to your next Loyalty check to recruit that army as you take advantage of disaffected deserters from your enemy who have turned to your side.

Engagement

When an army attacks another in melee, the armies become engaged even if the attack fails. Engaged armies are caught up in the thick of the fighting, seething together in a mass of bodies, blades, and blood. Once armies become engaged, neither can leave the battlefield until one or both armies are defeated, destroyed, or routed from the field, or until one side performs a successful Retreat, Withdrawal, or similar tactic that allows it to disengage from its enemies and those enemies either cannot or choose not to pursue them.

Fatigue

An army that becomes fatigued takes a -1 penalty to MV, RV, and DV. If an army engages in an activity that causes it to become fatigued when it is already fatigued, it becomes exhausted instead. Its penalties increase to -3 and its movement is halved.

If an army performs an action that would cause it to become fatigued when it is already exhausted, the army takes 1d4 damage. To remove fatigue, an army must retreat or withdraw from the battlefield and remain away from the battle for at least 2 Battle phases; each Battle Phase after the first that it spends resting, it may attempt a Morale check to recover from its fatigue. If a battle ceases for at least 8 consecutive hours, armies on both sides can attempt a Morale check to recover from fatigue.

If a unit is exhausted, making one Morale check to recover improves its condition to fatigued. The army can attempt an additional Morale check for each Battle Phase it continues to rest away from the battlefield (or each 8 hours when no battle occurs) to remove the fatigued condition.

Healing After Battle

An army that remains on the field or is able to retreat from it without being defeated (i.e., all of its divisions reduced to 0 hit points) can rest for 1 hour in order to regain hit points equal to 1/2 its ACR and automatically reduces the exhausted condition to fatigued. If the army can rest for 8 additional hours without interruption, it regains hit points equal to its ACR and automatically removes the fatigued condition. Thereafter, an army heals hit points equal to its ACR for every 24 hours of complete rest. Armies that are marching, guarding prisoners, or performing other light-duty tasks heal half the normal amount of hit points (rounding down). Armies that engage in a battle or that take damage from a forced march do not heal at all. Whenever an army heals, it can allocate the hit points it regained to its divisions as it chooses, including defeated divisions at 0 hit points, though not divisions which have been destroyed by taking damage when already at 0 hit points. An army that has been defeated but is able to exit the battlefield regains 1 hit point after 1 hour of rest.

After this time, it can again function as an army, including using the healing rules described above.

If the army is destroyed or disbands, it cannot heal.

Any ability that provides healing doubles the number of hit points regained by one army during the first hour of its rest (or allows a defeated army to regain hit points equal to half its ACR after 1 hour of rest).

Parley

Once per battle, at the beginning of any Battle Phase, the commander of either army may ask for parley, a meeting under a flag of truce with a spokesperson for the opposing side. You must use this maneuver before any army has attacked in the Battle Phase. The commander asking for Parley must make a Diplomacy or Intimidate check opposed by the Diplomacy or Intimidate check of the opposing general. When using Diplomacy, the commander adds his Empire’s Fame score to this check. When using Intimidate, the commander adds his Empire’s Infamy score instead. Each commander chooses which skill to use and need not choose the same skill. A commander takes a -1 penalty for each unit under his command that has been defeated or routed, -2 for each that has been destroyed. If your 62 check equals or exceeds the opposing general’s, you can force them (or their representative) to come forth and meet you under a temporary truce to discuss terms of surrender or withdrawal from the field, to offer a challenge of champions or other contest, to exchange hostages or negotiate ransom, or simply to taunt and bluster at one another. Armies normally do not attack during the Battle Phase when a Parley occurs, though they may use command boons or disengage from enemy armies or perform other actions that are not attacks. If a unit does attack during a Parley, the Empire whose army it is gains +1d4 Infamy, and each unit that attacks loses 1 point of Morale. In addition, your armies gain a +1 bonus to MV and RV and on opposed Morale checks against any army that attacks during the Parley for the remainder of the battle.

Victory and Aftermath

Once all armies but those belonging to one side have been eliminated, whether defeated, destroyed, disbanded, routed, or retreated from the field, that army is victorious.

Fighting In The Command Zone

Once the active armies of one side have been swept from the Melee and Ranged zones, that army’s Command zone is considered overrun and the commanders of that army can be captured or killed.

You can resolve the overrun of an army’s Command zone in several ways.

Combat: The Leader(s) of your force can engage in direct character-to-character combat with the Leader(s) of the enemy force. This plays out using the standard personal combat rules, but Leaders from the victorious army gain a +2 bonus to attack rolls, saving throws, skill checks, and initiative for the duration of this combat. Your armies generally do not participate directly in this kind of confrontation, as they are assumed to be securing the area and taking junior commanders and soldiers into custody while the major PCs and NPCs fight. If an NPC Leader ends a round of combat at less than half their hit points, there is a 50% chance per round that the Leader surrenders.

Execution: If a commander or other significant Leader is captured, the Leaders of the triumphant army have the option to publicly execute that Leader. If that Leader is a player character, they should generally be allowed the chance to escape execution by playing out a normal combat encounter; however, if they have already been overcome and rendered helpless in normal combat, execution may be their fate. NPC Leaders are killed automatically if the victorious Leader calls for execution. Being killed in combat is not considered an execution, nor is a Leader choosing to commit suicide; a Leader must be slain as a helpless captive (usually by a coup de grace) for it to be treated as an execution.

Executing an enemy Leader earns +1 Infamy for the Empire whose army performs the execution if the executed character is an Empire Leader (+2 if they are the ruler). If you execute all Leaders you capture in a battle, rather than just one, you earn double the Infamy modifier for the highest-ranking Leader you execute. Executing ordinary military commanders that are not Empire Leaders does not affect an Empire’s Infamy.

Ransom: Rather than being executed or kept as a captive, in many cultures it is commonplace to offer up Leaders captured in battle (including those whose armies have been destroyed, even if their side later won the battle) for ransom. A usual ransom demand for an Empire Leader is 1 BP times the captive Leader’s character level or CR. This ransom demand is halved for a Leader that does not have a Leadership Role in the Empire (i.e., an ordinary military commander) but is doubled if the captive Leader is the Empire’s ruler. These ransom demands typically include only the ransomed person and a noble or royal outfit of ordinary clothing, though the Leader’s captors can of course return any additional items they choose. If double the normal ransom is paid, the ransomed character’s goods are returned along with them. At the GM’s option, individual items may also be ransomed separately. Offering to return Leaders that you hold captive in exchange for a ransom is considered a mark of honor and gains your Empire +1 Fame for an Empire Leader, +2 Fame for a ruler. You gain an additional +1 Fame if you offer to ransom all Leaders you capture in a battle (assuming there is more than one). If you pay a ransom to recover your Leaders, you lose an amount of Fame for your own country equal to what the captor’s Empire gains; however, you gain an equivalent bonus to Loyalty, as your subjects appreciate the lengths to which the Empire will go to reclaim its own.

Fame and Infamy: The Empire of a victorious army gains a +1 to either Fame or Infamy when all enemy armies are defeated, destroyed, disbanded, 63 routed, or have retreated from the field. This bonus is increased by +1 if a Colony is captured and occupied, and the bonus is doubled if the victorious army is able to triumph while losing no more than 1 army. The Empire of an army on the losing side in a battle loses 1 point of Fame (2 points if it allowed a Fort or Colony to be captured by enemy forces), and this loss of Fame is doubled if in defeat they failed to defeat, destroy, disband, or rout more than one enemy army.

Morale: Success and failure on the battlefield obviously have a significant impact on the Morale of the surviving armies involved. What transpires in between battles likewise helps an army, defeated or triumphant, prepare for its next foray onto the battlefield. Careful preparation and training with their Leaders keeps them sharp and ready, while armies languish after too long a period of inactivity.

Table 8-3: Army Morale Modifiers
Modifier Condition
+1d4 Winning a battle (-1 per allied army defeated or destroyed, to a minimum or 0).
+1 Trains with Empire general or significant character for 1 Turn
+1 Pay double Consumption for 2 consecutive Turns
-1d4 If an army’s commander is captured and executed while the army still exists
-1 Take friendly fire damage from an allied army
-1 Per Turn without combat (per 10 Turns for reserve army)
-1 Survives battle, but battle lost (a Colony captured by enemy armies, or more armies lost than the enemy in a battle in the open field).
-2 Survives battle but routed from the battlefield.
-3 Consumption not paid, per Turn (active armies only)

Pillage and Plunder: The equipment and supplies of a defeated army or unit can be taken by the victors in a battle as spoils of war. These spoils are worth a number of BP equal to 1/4 the ACR of an army that is defeated, or 1/2 the ACR of an army that has been disbanded or destroyed. In addition, an army of 50 or more soldiers can be sent into any Sector containing terrain improvements, spending one Turn burning fields, slaughtering civilians, tearing down buildings, and generally wreaking havoc. Armies can attack Infrastructure in a Colony whose defenders all have been defeated, destroyed, disbanded, or routed. This is treated as attacking an enemy army, with a building having an effective DV equal to 15 plus the building’s Defense modifier (if any) and hit points equal to its BP value. The army can attack once per Battle Phase (if a battle is still going on nearby) or three times per Moment (if not). Infrastructure reduced to less than half its hit points (BP value) ceases providing any benefits to the Empire that owns it. Infrastructure can be repaired on its owner’s next Empire Turn, spending BP equal to the damage the Infrastructure has taken. If the building is reduced to 0 hit points (BP value), it is destroyed.

Prisoners Of War

As described in the Bloodied, Defeated, Destroyed, and Disbanded section, armies on the losing side in a battle are rarely if ever completely wiped out.

In most cases, the wounded and surrendered far outnumber the dead. This raises the question, of course, of what to do with enemy soldiers now in your custody. Turning them loose to rejoin their fellows in the fight against you is hardly a viable option (though officers and Leaders may be ransomed).

Generally speaking, a victorious army has three options: forced labor, internment, or massacre.

Civilian Prisoners: Civilian populations can be rounded up and imprisoned, put to work, or slaughtered just as captured soldiers can. Abuse of civilians is generally frowned upon. Imprisoning civilians generates +1 Infamy per District’s worth of civilians placed in internment, and Infamy modifiers for forced labor and massacre are doubled. However, civilians are generally less likely (or less able) to rebel against their captors, and each District’s worth of civilians is counted as only half a division of an army for the purpose of how many guards are required. If any portion of a civilian population of a Sector or a Colony is made captive, any bonuses from buildings in that Sector or Colony (except for Defense value) is halved; if 50% or more of the civilian population is eliminated, all benefits for that Infrastructure is lost.

Forced Labor: Soldiers captured in battle can be put under guard and forced to work for the benefit of their new Empire. For each division worth of captives forced to work for a full Turn, you can reduce the cost of any Infrastructure by 1 BP, or you can compel them to labor on any Infrastructure of your choice, increasing the economy bonus of that Infrastructure by 1. Forced laborers do not increase your Empire’s Consumption, as their unpaid labor and meager standard of living offset what little they consume. However, using prisoners for forced labor results in a -1 penalty to Stability per District or division of forced laborers (or fraction thereof), and your Empire gains +1 Infamy each Turn it uses prisoners for forced labor. Prisoners used for forced labor must be guarded at all times, as described under internment below.

Internment: Soldiers captured in battle can simply be locked away, kept as prisoners for the duration of the conflict. Prisoners must be kept under guard, either in temporary stockades or permanent prisons.

Any army capable of fighting can guard a number of soldiers equal to an army 2 sizes larger. If there are more prisoners than this, the Empire holding the captives must make a Stability check each week with a cumulative -1 penalty for each army size the interred army is larger than the guarding army by 2. A failed Stability check results in an uprising among the prisoners, which is treated as a Vandals Empire Event. Prisoners can instead be escorted to permanent internment at a Prison or a piece of Military Infrastructure, which can contain an army whose size is up to 1/4 of the Infrastructure’s BP value. This number can be increased by crowding prisoners into narrow quarters, up to five times the normal amount, but each added multiple beyond x1 generates 1 point of Unrest. Stationing a reserve army at the same Infrastructure reduces Unrest by 1. Interning captives increases your Empire’s Consumption by the size value of the detained army. Consumption increase by half by starving your prisoners; however, doing so causes you to gain +1 Infamy each Turn.

Massacre: A victorious army may decide that they lack the resources or the desire to keep its captive enemies alive, choosing instead to wipe them out, killing them to the last. Massacre of enemy forces earns +2 Infamy per army put to death (regardless of size). Your Empire earns +6 Infamy for the massacre of any number of civilians.

Player Characters in Battle

In addition to the option of your PCs being commanders in your armies, the GM may have you fight smaller groups of enemies before or even during a battle in which your armies clash with the enemy. For example, your PCs might attack a commander and fight your way through his forces to confront him directly and defeat him while your army battles his forces. Alternatively, your PCs could use potent spells (such as gravitational singularity or terraform) to alter battlefield conditions in your favor. These possibilities let you use your characters to directly affect the outcome of a battle without forcing you to sit out on an adventure opportunity by personally commanding an army. If your PCs win the small-scale combat or dramatically affect the battlefield, the GM could opt to increase your army’s MV and DV by +4 for that battle or penalize your armies by —4 if you lose. At the GM’s discretion, your PCs’ failure or victory might have other effects on your armies as well, such as temporarily granting an additional tactic, altering the hit points of one or more armies, or granting or negating a special ability.

Equipping An Army

Equipping an army for battle is an expensive endeavor. At the time an army is created, as a default it is assumed to possess basic melee weapons and light armor. Gear can be upgraded at any time after the unit is created, assuming the army is in the same Sector as a Colony where an Armament Edict is issued. However, each time gear is changed for an army after creation, the army must undergo training with their new gear. This takes one Turn, and until training is completed the army gains no benefit from its new equipment. An Army can have any amount of gear, although bonuses from the same category of gear (such as armor, weaponry, or Cost: This listed BP cost should be multiplied by the Equipment modifier on Table: Army Size for the army type.

  • Weapons of at least tier 2 are considered magical for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Weapons of at least tier 3, weapons that deal sonic damage, or siege weapons of any tier bypass hardness
  • Medical Supplies do not grant any bonuses, but rather allow the army to use the Enhanced Healing Command Boon a certain number of times (once for tier 1, 5 times for tier 2). Once expended, they must be paid for again.
  • Mobility Enhancements grant the listed special ability to the army.
  • An Ace is not a piece of equipment so much as it is a one-time service or utility which can be used to increase the capability of the army for one battle Phase.

When expending one of their aces, the army gains one of the following benefits for that Phase.

  • +2 to MV and RV
  • +2 to DV
  • +4 to Morale checks to disengage
  • +3 to speed for one moment

Specialized Weapons grant one of the following Special Abilities to the army: Arc, Blast, Bleed, Block, Boost, Burn, Explode, Knockdown, Stagger, or Wound. Alternatively, they can grant the ability to deal an additional type of damage (chosen from kinetic, acid, fire, cold, electricity, or sonic).

  • If a character is fighting alone as a size 1 army and possesses a weapon with the properties from specialized weapons, they gain those properties as special abilities. They are considered to have Tier 1 weaponry and armor if they are wielding weapons and armor of at least 2nd level, Tier 2 weaponry and armor if at least 8th level, and Tier 3 weaponry and armor of at least 15th level.

Tactics

Tactics differ from strategy in that they represent specific maneuvers that an army can perform on the battlefield focused on attack, defense, movement, or a combination of the three. Strategy dictates each side’s overall approach to what all of their armies will do, but each individual army can adopt its own unique tactics.

An army can select one tactic each Battle Phase, and maneuvers marked with an asterisk (*) are usable only once during a battle by each side as they represent either maneuvers based on limited resources or on battlefield deception. Some maneuvers require one or more kinds of specialized equipment for the army performing it. In order to use a tactic, an army must be trained in it, either when it is created, through training, or through victory in battle, up to a maximum number of tactics equal to its ACR. All armies know the Full Defense, Furious Charge, Retreat, Standard, and Withdraw tactics (and an army with ranged weapons automatically has the Volley tactic); these tactics do not count against this maximum.

Table 8-4: Army Equipment
Equipment Cost MV RV DV Movement
Armor, Light tier 1 2 BP     +1  
Armor, Heavy tier 1 6 BP     +2 -1
Armor, Light tier 2 12 BP     +2
Armor, Heavy tier 2 16 BP +3 -1
Armor, Light tier 3 20 BP     +3
Armor, Heavy tier 3 24 BP     +4 -1
Melee Weaponry, tier 1 2 BP +1      
Melee Weaponry, tier 2 12 BP +2      
Melee Weaponry tier 3 21 BP +3      
Ranged Weaponry tier 1 3 BP   +1    
Ranged Weaponry tier 2 13 BP   +2    
Ranged Weaponry tier 3 24 BP   +3    
Specialized Weapons 7 BP        
Siege Weaponry tier 1 7 BP +1 +1
Siege weaponry tier 2 13 BP +1 +2 -1
Siege Weaponry tier 3 23 BP +2 +3 -1
Transports tier 1 8 BP +1 +1
Transports tier 2 15 BP +1 +1 +1 +2
Transports tier 3 30 BP +2 +1 +2 +3
Mobile Fortifications tier 1 2 BP     +1 -1
Mobile Fortifications tier 2 13 BP   +2  
Mobile Fortifications tier 3 25 BP     +3  
Medical Supplies tier 1 3 BP        
Medical Supplies tier 2 10 BP        
Mobility Enhancement (Climb) 4 BP        
Mobility Enhancement (Swim) 3 BP        
Mobility Enhancement (Burrow) 9 BP        
Mobility Enhancement (Earth Glide) 14 BP        
Mobility Enhancement (Flight) 20 BP        
Ace 8 BP        

Cautious Combat: Your army fights cautiously in order to maintain morale. Decrease its MV and RV by 2 and add 2 to all its Morale checks.

Covering Fire*: Your army keeps some of its soldiers back from the front lines in order to provide covering fire for you and allies and to strafe targets of opportunity trying to move around you. Once per Battle Phase, when your army or an allied army disengages from an enemy army, including the Retreat or Withdraw Tactic, or a army that routs or is destroyed, you can make a ranged attack against the enemy army from which it is trying to disengage. If your attack hits, you inflict 1d4-1 Casualties and your allied unit gains a +1 bonus to DV and to opposed Morale checks made to disengage. This tactic requires ranged weapons

Defensive Wall: Your army fights defensively, taking actions to protect fellow units as needed. Decrease its MV and RV by 2 and increase its DV by 2.

Dirty Fighters*: Your army uses trickery and unfair tactics to gain an advantage at the start of a battle. For one Melee Phase this battle, its MV and RV increases by 6.

Driving Strike: Your army’s MV and RV increases by 2 against armies that don’t have vehicles. The army must have the transport resource to use this tactic.

Driving Sweep: Your army is trained in making swift attacks against infantry, dashing across the battlefield and harrying the enemy. Your unit can attack two non-transport armies in a single Battle Phase. Your army gains -4 MV and RV and -2 DV for the remainder of the Battle Phase and your attacks deal only half damage, but you are not considered engaged after attacking an army without transports. The army must have the transport resource to use this tactic.

False Retreat*: Once per battle, your army can make a false retreat, luring a target enemy army deeper into your territory. On the Phase your army makes a false retreat, it doesn’t attempt an Offense check. On the Phase after it uses this tactic, increase its MV, RV, and DV by 6 against the target army.

Feint: Your army makes bluffs an attack to draw enemies out of position and distract them from greater threats elsewhere on the battlefield. On a successful attack, you deal half damage but do not become engaged. In addition, your army and the army you attack must make opposed Morale checks with a bonus equal to the unit’s ACR. If you win this opposed check, the defending unit is drawn out of position and takes a -2 penalty to DV for the rest of the Battle Phase. If your attack fails, your attack does no damage and your unit becomes engaged with the defender.

Full Defense: Your army focuses on total defense of the battlefield. Increase its DV by 4 and decrease its MV and RV by 4.

Furious Charge: Your army makes a furious rush to attack a defending army. You gain +2 MV, RV, and -2 DV for the remainder of the Battle Phase. An engaged unit cannot use this tactic. If you successfully attack an enemy unit, it takes a -1 penalty to Morale checks made to try disengaging with you until the end of Battle Phase.

Overwhelming Onslaught: Your army makes a wild and reckless attack meant to overwhelm and overrun the defending unit. Your army gains +4 MV and RV and -4 DV, and after resolving your attack you take you take 1d6-3 Casualties if the attack succeeds, 1d6 if the attack fails (these Casualties are modified by your Strategy, as per Table 1). If your attack succeeds against a target using Full Defense, Hunker Down, or Screening Defense tactics, the defending army must succeed on a Morale check (DC 10 + Attacker’s ACR) or those tactics are negated for the remainder of the Battle Phase. If the Morale check fails by 5 or more, that army cannot use any of those tactics again for the remainder of the battle. If you successfully attack an enemy army, it takes a -2 penalty to Morale checks made to try disengaging with you until the end of Battle Phase.

Hunker Down: Your unit grounds its armaments and sets them to fend off enemies. Your unit gains -2 MV and RV but gains +2 DV against armies with transports and deals +2 damage on a successful attack against an army with transports. In addition, your unit deals +1 damage against any army using the Aggressive Attack strategy, +2 against armies using All-Out Attack strategy.

Pincer Maneuver: Your army is trained to envelop an army that is already engaged by your allies. You gain +2 MV and RV against a unit that is already engaged by an allied army; however, because you are spread out you take a -2 penalty to your DV for the rest of the Battle Phase against attacks from armies that are not already engaged with you. When you use this tactic, an army engaged with you takes a -2 penalty to Morale checks made to disengage, flee, retreat, or withdraw for the remainder of the Battle Phase.

Pursuit: When an enemy army retreats, routs, or withdraws from the battlefield, your army can try to chase them down, even if they are in the Camp zone. Make an opposed Morale check against the target unit, with each unit adding their forced march Movement to this check (you gain an additional +1 bonus if the target unit routed in the previous Battle Phase). If your Morale check succeeds, you force the target army back into the Ranged or Melee zone (your choice) and can make a Standard melee attack or Volley ranged attack against that army. You cannot use this tactic if your army is engaged.

Relentless Brutality: Your army throws caution to the wind and attacks with savage and gory vigor. Increase its MV and RV by 4 and decrease its DV by 4.

Retreat: Your army can exit the battlefield completely with this tactic. Your army cannot attack during the Battle Phase in which it uses this maneuver and takes a -1 penalty to DV and Morale. The unit must attempt opposed Morale checks against all enemy armies engaged with it; each army adds its speed to this special Morale check. If an enemy army’s Morale check exceeds yours, it can make a free melee attack against you, even if it has already acted this round. Enemy armies that fail to beat your Morale check do not gain this free attack. If your army survives these attacks (even if your unit takes all of its Casualties, but not if it is destroyed), it disengages from all enemy armies and leaves the battlefield.

Screening Defense: Your army may choose another army to protect on the battlefield. Melee attacks made against the army you are protecting affect your army instead. While using this tactic, your army cannot attack any army unless it first attacks you in melee. The army you are protecting cannot be engaged by an enemy army unless your army is routed or destroyed. If the army you are protecting is already engaged, it remains engaged; using this maneuver does not force the opposing unit to disengage. The army you protect can be targeted with ranged attacks, though it gains a +2 bonus to DV against them. You take 1d6-3 points of damage if the army you guard is hit with a ranged attack; and the army you guard takes the same damage if your army is hit with a ranged attack.

Siegebreaker: Your army targets another army’s siege engines in an attempt to destroy them. If your army damages the target army, your army attempts a second Offense check; if successful, destroy one of the target’s siege engines. This tactic has no effect 69 on enemy armies without siege engines. In addition, an army using this tactic can try to circumvent the protection of an army using the Screening Defense tactic if the army it protects is equipped with siege weapons. If your attack against the screening army succeeds, your attack deals half damage to that army and you can make a second attack against the protected unit and its siege weapons. This attack also deals half damage.

Skirmishers: Your unit makes a quick probing strike and then disengages. Your unit takes a -2 MV and DV penalty and deals half damage on a successful attack, but you do not become engaged with the target unit whether or not your attack succeeds.

Sniper Support: Your army holds some ranged units in reserve to attack a target enemy army during the Melee Phase. If your army damages the target army in the Melee Phase, it deals 2 additional points of damage from these ranged attacks. The army must have ranged attacks to use this tactic.

Spellbreaker: Your army has specialists who can disrupt enemy spellcasting. Increase its DV by 4 against armies with the spellcasting ability.

Standard: Your army’s attacks have no additional modifiers to its MV, RV, DV, or damage.

Strafing Skirmishers: Your unit keeps on the move while riddling its targets with quick volleys. Your army takes a -2 MV and RV penalty and deals half damage on a successful attack during the ranged combat Phase, but it gains a +1 DV and once per round when attacked during the melee Phase your unit can attempt a Morale check to avoid becoming engaged. This maneuver requires ranged weaponry.

Taunt: Your army is skilled at taunting its opponents. The target army must attempt a Morale check (DC = 10 + your army’s ACR) at the start of each Melee or Gunnery Phase; failure means it reduces its MV, RV, and DV against your army by 2 for that Phase. If the target army succeeds at two of these Morale checks, it’s immune to this tactic for the remainder of the battle.

Volley: Your unit remains stationary and makes a ranged attack against any enemy unit on the field. This maneuver requires ranged weaponry.

Withdraw: Your army tries to escape from all armies attacking it. The army attempts an opposed Morale check against each army attacking it to maintain discipline (any army may voluntarily fail this check) but doesn’t need to attempt the usual Morale check to change tactics when switching to withdraw. If all of these checks are successful, your army may withdraw from the battlefield or treat the Phase as a Gunnery Phase. If only some are successful, you may withdraw or treat the Phase as a Gunnery Phase, but enemy armies in the battle may attack you as if you were in Melee. Whether or not the checks are successful, reduce your army’s MV and RV and DV by 2 for the rest of this Phase.

Commanders

An army’s commander helps maximize its effectiveness and can provide special bonuses to an army. The commander can be a PC or NPC. Unless you decide to command an army personally or the GM allows you to recruit an exceptional commander through adventuring and roleplaying, a new army’s commander is an unexceptional Leader who provides no bonuses to the army.

The Mass Combat Army Sheet has a space to record information about the commander of each of your armies. In addition, there’s also a space to record information for a general—a general is a character (often you) assigned to administrate your armies but is primarily a figurehead and grants no bonuses themself unless actively leading a particular army.

The relevant information is as follows (assume a value of 0 unless otherwise specified).

Name: This lists the commander’s name (and class and level, if notable).

Command Limit: An Empire can field a maximum number of armies in a battle equal to its Loyalty modifier divided by 10 (rounded down) plus the Charisma modifier of the Empire’s General. The Empire’s General has nominal command of all military forces of the Empire, though in any battle the General may or may not personally lead those armies. Often, another PC or NPC is designated as the local commander, such as the Heir, Marshal, Royal Enforcer, Ruler, and Warden, and this individual leads the armies involved in the battle.

Charisma Modifier: This lists the commander’s Charisma modifier. It is added to the army’s Morale checks.

Administration Bonus (AB): This is a bonus which reflects the commander’s skill in command. Divide the number of ranks in Profession (soldier) the commander possesses by 5 (minimum 0) and add that number to the army’s Morale checks, MV, RV, and DV. If the commander does not use skill ranks, divide their CR by 5.

Leadership: This stat determines the capacity of the Leader to lead, determining what command boons they can select, the effects of certain command boons, and the DCs of skill checks made against the army. A commander’s Leadership is equal to the commander’s modifier for Profession [Soldier] checks

Significant Characters: While each army has only one commander, it is certainly possible for more than one powerful character or creature to accompany and support an army. These special auxiliaries are called significant characters, and by embedding themselves within an army they allow that army to gain access to command boons that would not normally be available to them or their commander. A significant character can accompany only one army at a time. Each player character accompanying an army counts as a significant character. In the case of a GM-controlled army, those significant characters are typically unique NPCs, which should probably be comparable in number to the number of PCs present.

If no significant character is present with an army, it is led by an unexceptional commander that is a typical creature of the type comprising the army, with a number of ranks in Profession (soldier) equal to its Hit Dice or level, whichever is greater.

The Command Zone: The general in charge of the battle and any other significant characters that are not personally leading armies on the field are considered to be directing the battle from behind the lines. The Command Zone is not necessarily a fixed location but is wherever the commander and his aides may be at any given point, shuttling from place to place giving orders and providing support where it is required. Characters in the Command Zone are not part of any army and cannot be directly attacked or damaged until defending armies are eliminated, as described in Victory and Aftermath.

Command Boons: This lists the boons the commander knows. A commander’s maximum number of boons known is 1, plus 1 for every 5 ranks in Profession (soldier). a new or unexceptional commander might know no boons at first but can gain them from victories in battle. If you’re an Empire Leader acting as a commander, you automatically have one boon appropriate to your Leadership Role (see below).

The commander must be active with the army to grant a bonus on Morale checks or a boon to the army.

Being active requires spending at least 5 moments per Turn with the army. An army without a commander (whether because the commander is dead or because she isn’t spending enough time with the army) loses 1 Morale per week. You may offset this loss by doubling the army’s Consumption that week.

If you have an army without a commander and you have no commanders available to fill that Role, you may promote a soldier from the army to be an unexceptional commander. This commander has a +0 Charisma modifier, 0 ranks in Profession (soldier), and an Administration Bonus equal to a fifth of the level or CR of a typical member of that army (rounded down).

Many command boons have prerequisites based on class features, feats, or skills; usually these prerequisites depend on the commander or significant character, but some also depend on the creatures comprising the army to which the boon applies. Some boons affect all armies on a side, but some affect only a single army, usually the one led by the commander whose boon it is. However, some boons can be used to affect an allied army instead, or even shifted from army to army each Battle Phase. Unless otherwise specified, a significant character must be present at a battle (or, for some boons, with a specific army) in order to provide the benefits of a command boon.

Leaders and Losses: If a Leader is killed or incapacitated, any boons he provides are lost for the remainder of the battle, except for permanent boons. If an army is destroyed or disbanded, a d% should be rolled for its commander and any significant character fighting with it to determine if they escape (01-30), are killed (31-50), or are captured (51-00). Player characters should typically escape with 25% of their hit points rather than being killed, or the GM may run an individual combat encounter to resolve their fate. In any Event, characters that escape can spend one Battle Phase making their way to the Command Zone (not counting the Phase in which their army was eliminated). Once there, the commanding general can reassign them to a new army and in subsequent Battle Phases they can again make use of their command boon (not including permanent boons).

Permanent Boons: Some command boons are not dependent on a specific action taken by a commander during battle, but instead reflect specialized training of the unit with their commander and with other soldiers with a similar range of skills. These permanent boons must be applied when an army is created, and the commander cannot later shift the permanent boon to a different army, though he can retire from command of the army. The Leader forfeits the ability to grant a boon (or one boon, if able to grant more than one) for 2d4 months after retiring. If the commander leaves an army with a permanent boon, whether through death, retirement, or some other incapacity, and is not replaced by another significant Leader that also qualifies to grant the same command boon, the army loses 1d4 points of Morale and the permanent boon is lost within 1d4 months. Boons denoted with a (P) are permanent If you have an Empire Leadership Role (Ruler, High Priest, Grand Diplomat, and so on), you may take the Role of an army commander. To determine your bonus on Morale checks and the maximum number of boons you can know, use one fifth of your level. As with other commanders, you must remain active with the army to grant your commander bonus on Morale checks and must be at the battle to provide tactics and bonuses. Your Leadership Role determines what boons you automatically know (even if you don’t meet the Leadership requirements for those boons). If a Role lists multiple boons, you must choose one when you become a commander. (Others may be gained in the normal manner)

Ambassador: Defensive Tactics, Merciless

Chief Justice: Bonus Tactic, Merciless, Sharpshooter

Chief Technologist: Advanced Tactics, Loyalty

Consort: Loyalty

Speaker: Loyalty

General: Bonus Tactic, Flexible Tactics, Merciless, Sharpshooter

Head of Security: Defensive Tactics, Hold the Line, Loyalty

High Priest: Hold the Line, Triage

Magister: Flexible Tactics, Loyalty

Ruler: Bloodied but Unbroken, Loyalty

Space Warden: Hit and Run, Sharpshooter, Triage

Spymaster: Hit and Run, Merciless, Sharpshooter

Successor: Loyalty

Treasurer: Loyalty

Viceroy: Loyalty

Command Boons

The following boons can be selected by commanders, but no boon can be applied to an army more than once unless otherwise noted. Most boons apply to only one army at a time but can be shifted from unit to unit during each Battle Phase. A boon marked with an A applies to all allied armies (or includes an effect that affects all allied armies). A boon marked with P is a permanent boon that applies to only a single army and cannot be shifted to other armies.

Advanced Tactics: An army with this boon gains a +2 bonus to its MV and RV; however, this bonus is halved if the target army also has Advanced Tactics or Defensive Tactics. The character granting this boon must have at least 11 ranks in 5 different skills, one of which must be Profession (soldier).

Battlefield Illumination: Once per battle, an army with this ability can increase the light level on the battlefield by one category for all armies on the field (see Visibility). Alternatively, that army can increase lighting levels by two categories, though the modifiers for this enhanced light level apply only to that army and any army engaged with it, and to ranged attacks made against that army and any army engaged with it. An enemy army with Magical Advantage can forgo attacking in order to eliminate this increased light by making an opposed Morale check against the army that created the illumination.

Bloodied but Unbroken: The commander inspires the army to be at its greatest in the most desperate times. When an army’s hit points are at half its full normal hit points or fewer, it gains a +1 bonus on Offense checks. a commander must have Leadership 4 or higher to select this boon. At Leadership 10 or higher, this bonus increases to +2.

Bonus Tactic: Choose one tactic. The commander always knows this tactic, and the commander’s army can use this tactic even if it doesn’t know that tactic on its own. You can select this boon multiple times; each time you select it, choose a new tactic.

Combined Tactics: An army with this boon deploys screening infantry to defend its ranged attackers. The army cannot attack in the Melee Phase but gains a +1 bonus to its DV until the beginning of the next Battle Phase and can make ranged attacks even if engaged. The character granting this boon and the creatures comprising the army must have ranged weapons and a Dexterity of 13 or higher.

Cornucopia: An army with this boon has a magical or technological means of supplying itself with food and drink and banishing fatigue, reducing its dependence on a heavy supply train and giving it great strength at resisting sieges. The unit can attempt a Morale check to avoid becoming fatigued after using a forced march and it never becomes fatigued if it is inside a Colony or fortification that is blockaded, as described in the Siege Warfare section. An army with this boon treats its ACR as 2 higher for the purpose of healing after combat. The character granting this boon must have at least 5 ranks in life science.

Daring Maneuvers: An army with this boon can overextend itself to press home an advantage, though this leaves its flanks exposed. The army gains a +4 MV or RV bonus but takes a -2 penalty to DV until it acts in the next Battle Phase.

Death Before Dishonor: An army with this boon reduces Morale penalties or reductions, regardless of their source. All effects that would cause a -1 penalty to Morale have no effect, while larger Morale penalties or reductions are reduced by 1.

Defensive Tactics: The commander is especially good at defensive tactics. Increase the army’s DV by 2. a commander must have Leadership 5 or higher to select this boon.

Expansive Influence: The commander’s influence, either through magic or technology, stretches far beyond the battlefield. The commander does not need to be on the battlefield in order to lead his troops, commanding them from elsewhere in the universe and hence not risking their own capture or death.

Expert Flankers: The commander is skilled at surrounding the foe and distracting them, at the cost of spreading out too much and being more vulnerable. Increase the army’s MV and RV by 2, and decrease its DV by 2.

Falling Dusk: Once per battle, an army with this ability can decrease the light level on the battlefield by one category for all armies on the field (see Visibility). Alternatively, that army can decrease lighting levels by two categories, though the modifiers for this decreased light level apply only to that army and any army engaged with it, and to ranged attacks made against that army and any army engaged with it. An enemy army with Magical Advantage can forgo attacking in order to eliminate this decreased light by making an opposed Morale check against the army that created the darkness. The character granting this boon must have the create darkness ability.

Flexible Tactics (A): The commander trains the army to be receptive to multiple orders during a battle. The army gains a +5 bonus on Morale checks to change tactics during a battle. a commander must have Leadership 6 or higher to select this boon. At Leadership 12 or higher, this bonus increases to +10.

Hit and Run (P): The commander drills the army in quick attacks followed by a fast retreat. After attacks are resolved in the Gunnery Phase or the first Melee Phase, the army may use the withdraw tactic with a +2 bonus on its opposed Morale checks. A commander must have Leadership 5 or higher to select this boon. At Leadership 10 or higher, this bonus increases to +4.

Hold the Line (A): The commander is skilled at convincing the army to maintain morale against dangerous opponents. If the army fails a Morale check to avoid a rout, it may reroll that check. It must accept the results of the second check, even if it is worse.

Implacable Advance: Each Melee Phase, this boon grants one army a +1 bonus to MV, RV, damage, and Morale until the end of the current Melee Phase. Any army it attacks takes a -1 penalty to Morale until the beginning of the next Battle Phase.

Last Stand (P): A unit with this boon can stave off elimination when on the brink of destruction. If the army is reduced to 0 hit points or below, it is not defeated or destroyed if it receives a Magical Healing boon or uses Medical Supplies before the end of the current Battle Phase sufficient to restore it to at least 1 hit point. Even if it does not receive this healing, it remains engaged with any enemy armies until the end of the next Melee Phase, and it can make an attack in that Phase against an army engaged with it, though it cannot move, retreat, disengage, or attack armies not engaged with it.

Loyalty: The commander inspires great Loyalty in the army. The army gains a +2 bonus on all Morale checks. a commander must have Leadership 6 or higher to select this boon. At Leadership 12 or higher, this bonus increases to +4. As long as a commander with this boon and his army are active on the field, all allied armies gain a +1 bonus to Morale checks made to avoid routing or disbanding during the Rout Phase.

Magical Advantage: All allied armies gain a +1 bonus on damage rolls and gain a +1 bonus to Morale checks if the army they attack does not also have Magical Advantage or Magical Protection. Requirement: The character providing this boon must be able to cast at least one spell of 3rd level or higher.

Magical Barrage: An army with this boon can attack during the Gunnery Phase with a bonus to RV equal to the level of the highest-level spell that the character granting the boon is able to cast. Requirement: The character granting the boon must be capable of casting at least one area-effect offensive spell of 3rd level or higher.

Magical Favor: An army with this boon can add a +1 bonus to any die roll once per Battle Phase. It may apply this bonus after the result of the roll is known. Alternatively, once per battle it may choose to reroll any one die roll it makes; if it uses this ability, it forfeits the benefits of this boon for the remainder of the battle and for 1d4 moments thereafter. The character granting this boon must be capable of casting 3rd-level spells.

Magical Healing: Immediately before the end of each Battle Phase, this unit can remove 2d4 hp of damage from any one allied army. If the target army is fatigued, that condition is removed but the damage healed is halved. If the target army is exhausted, that condition is reduced to fatigued and the damage healed is halved. Requirement: The character granting this boon must be able to cast a healing spell of at least 3rd level.

Magical Protection: An army with this boon gains a +1 bonus to its DV and reduces damage from all attacks by 1 point. In addition, modifiers from enemies using Magical Advantage, Magical Barrage, and Magical Trickery are negated for an army with this boon. Requirement: The character granting this boon must be capable of casting abjuration spells of 3rd level or higher.

Magical Trickery: At the beginning of each Battle Phase, this army may select one enemy army to confound with illusions, mind-affecting effects, and magical barriers to sight and movement. The target army takes a penalty equal to 1/2 the highest-level spell that the character providing this boon is able to cast, and that character may choose to affect the target army’s MV, RV, DV, Morale, Movement, or Scouting, or as a bonus to an allied army’s Camouflage. If the target army’s speed is reduced to 0, it cannot disengage or use any tactic, boon, or special ability requiring movement. Each round, you may target a different enemy army, or you may continue targeting the same army with a different penalty or repeating the same penalty. The effects of Magical Trickery end at the beginning of the next Battle Phase unless you renew them. Requirement: The character granting this boon must be able to cast at least one area-effect illusion or mind-affecting spell or spell that impedes movement (e.g., slow) of 3rd level or higher.

Master Recruiter: The maximum number of armies the Empire may possess and lead in battle is increased by 2. If this boon is lost, the army with the lowest Morale immediately disbands and flees the battlefield. If multiple armies have identical Morale scores, determine randomly). This boon can be selected more than once, and its effects stack.

Merciless: The commander encourages the army to be ruthless in its tactics and spare no wounded enemies. The army gains a +1 bonus on opposed Morale checks to prevent another army from withdrawing and on the last Offense check against a routed army or one using the withdraw tactic. In addition, if you reduce an enemy army to 0 hit points, it is automatically destroyed rather than merely defeated.

Quick Repairs: An army inside a fortification can conduct emergency repairs while a battle still rages, repairing 1d6 points of damage to a fortification at the end of each Rout Phase (assuming the army has not been routed itself). An army on board one or more ships, or a naval squadron with this command boon, can likewise use this ability to repair ships that have not been destroyed. The character granting this boon must be able to cast at least one 3rd-level or higher conjuration spell.

Ready for Battle: An army with this boon gains a +4 bonus to skill checks made to determine tactical initiative during the Tactics Phase.

Screaming for Vengeance: The first time during a battle that any army is defeated, destroyed, or routed (but not if it is disbanded), all allied armies gain a +1 bonus to MV, RV, and Morale checks for the remainder of that Battle Phase (doubled to +2 if attacking or engaged with the army that defeated, destroyed, or routed their allied army).

Sharpshooter: The commander drills the army in precision ranged attacks. The army gains a +2 bonus on Offense checks against armies using fortifications. In addition, the army never deals friendly fire damage to allied armies. This boon has no effect if the army can’t make ranged attacks.

Skywardens (A): An army with this command boon gains +1 RV, +2 DV, and +2 to all Perception checks (see Camouflage, Scouting, and Ambushes) made against flying armies.

Smoke Screen: Once per battle, an army with this boon can cover the entire battlefield with light smoke (see Visibility) that lasts until the end of the current Battle Phase. Alternatively, that army can cover itself with heavy smoke, though the modifiers for this heavy smoke apply only to that army and any army engaged with it, and to ranged attacks made against that army and any army engaged with it. The character granting this boon must be capable of casting fog cloud or a similar spell.

Surgical Strike: An army with this boon gains +2 MV but takes a -2 penalty on damage. In addition, if this army’s MV exceeds the DV of the target army 75 by 5 or more, the attacking unit may choose how to allocate the damage it deals among the defending unit’s divisions.

Swift Pursuit: An army with this boon gains a +2 bonus to Morale checks to disengage.

Triage: Whether using magic or medicine, the commander drills the army in using emergency methods to treat wounds. Once per battle, the army may take a –4 penalty on its Offense check during the Ranged or Melee Phase and heal damage equal to half its ACR. If the army has the medical supplies resource, it also gains the healing from this boon (without the Offense check penalty) when it uses medical supplies.

War Chant (A): An army with this boon unleashes a constant stream of whoops, yells, pounding drums, bashing shields, and rhythmic battle music that heartens them in the face of danger and intimidates their opponents. The army gains a +1 bonus on its own Morale checks during battle, and any army engaged with this army takes a -1 penalty on Morale checks for as long as it remains engaged and for 1 Battle Phase after it disengages. In addition, during any Battle Phase in which the army damages another army in melee, the target army takes a -1 penalty to its MV and RV during the next Battle Phase against the army with this boon.

Wolves in the Fold (P): An army with this boon uses disguise and deception to infiltrate enemy lines and throw them into chaos. On the first Melee Phase of a battle, this army gains a +1d6 bonus to its MV and RV, and on a successful attack the target army takes a -1 penalty to its own MV, RV, DV, and Morale until the beginning of the next Battle Phase. The character granting the boon and the soldiers must have the trick attack special attack, shapechanger subtype, change shape or disguise self ability, or a Disguise or Stealth bonus of +10 or greater.

Maintaining An Army

In addition to resources spent in fighting, an army also consumes a great deal when deployed or otherwise assembled. The following rules are used for determining the functions of a standing military.

Abstract Armed Forces: While not directly represented in the mass combat rules, the monthly Stability checks the Empire makes to keep the Empire functioning smoothly assume the existence of ordinary local watch, police force, and military patrols throughout the Empire.

These abstract armies have no statistics as such but allow the Empire to deal with local threats arising from Empire Events and other small-scale disturbances. Abstract armed forces do not affect your Consumption.

Active Armies: An Empire can maintain a maximum number of active armies equal to its Loyalty modifier divided by 2 plus the Charisma modifier of the Empire’s general. Active armies can be stationed in any Sector your Empire has claimed (or sent into an unclaimed Sector if you wish). The Empire must pay the full Consumption cost for each active army.

Reserve Armies: In addition to keeping active armies in the field, an Empire can maintain any number of reserve armies. Reserve armies do not count against the Empire’s command limit, and the Empire must only pay one quarter the Consumption cost for soldiers in a reserve army.

Once formed, reserve armies must be stationed in a specific Colony. A Colony can store a single army (which may be a combination of several armies, see combining armies) whose ACR does not exceed the Colony’s level (Military category boons can increase this value). Bringing a reserve army into active duty costs BP equal to half the army’s ACR

Retiring an Army: You can retire a reserve army in any Colony where it is stationed. You recover a number of BP equal to 1/2 the army’s ACR from the sale of its equipment and increased productivity in that city as workers return to their jobs. Retiring an army generates BP equal to the army’s ACR. A retired army generates no Consumption.

Supply Lines: It takes more resources to supply an army when it is away from your supply network. Any time an active army is 10 or more Sectors away from your nearest Colony, its Consumption is increased by 25% per 10 Sectors, up to a maximum increase of 100%.

Reinforcements and Reformation

The following rules are for manipulating or supplementing armies which already exist.

Moving Divisions: If you have two or more armies made up of identical divisions, at any time outside of combat you can move divisions between them, altering the ACR of both armies. Round up to determine the ACR of the army when accounting for the number of divisions, accounting for any deficiency the resulting army may have in divisions (for example, an army with 9 divisions is considered a size 7 army which is missing one division).

If two armies are completely merged, choose one of the two commanders to command this combined army. The other commander may be assigned to a different army; otherwise, their boons are lost. If both smaller armies had a boon, resource, or tactic, the new army has it as well; otherwise the boon, resource, or tactic is lost. The new army’s Morale is equal to the average of the Morale of the two smaller armies. If one army has an affliction (such as a disease), the new army now has it. Damage to individual divisions is retained when they are moved.

If an army is separated into two or more armies, the child armies retain all tactics the larger army possessed. The commander of the parent army must select which army they continue to lead, and that army retains all boons the commander granted. A new commander should be assigned for each of the other armies or else these armies are considered leaderless.

Replenishing Armies: In addition to recruiting new armies, recruitment Edicts can be made to add new soldiers to an army. When you recruit an army of at least size 2 using a recruitment Edict and already have an army of identical creatures whose size is no more than three sizes greater than the smaller army, you may merge the smaller army with the larger one, removing one instance of the bloodied condition from the larger army. If the smaller army is only one size smaller than the existing army, it removes all instances of the bloodied condition when merged.

Special Abilities

Often, armies will possess special abilities which make them more capable and dangerous than a simple mob of armed creatures. Many troops will possess superhuman abilities and class training which can cause conflict to escalate in new ways. Modifiers for these abilities apply only if most of the units in an army have the listed ability. For a class ability, a parenthetical note after the ability name indicates the class and the level the units of the army must be to confer that ability. If a class ability listed here presents two alternative options, you must choose one of these options when the army is formed, and it can’t ever be changed.

You can use the following special abilities as inspiration to generate additional army abilities of your own.

Unless otherwise stated, the effects of these special abilities (other than hp damage) end when a battle ends. Note that you count as your own ally for abilities that effect allied armies.

As most armies are made up of NPCs, most will not have class levels in the traditional sense. Treat any creature with a class graft as having levels in 77 the grafted class equal to the creature’s CR for the purpose of determining what abilities it has and how effective they are.

Amorphous: Any bonuses from boons or tactics used against the army are reduced by 1

Amphibious: The army can move in or across bodies of water and ignore Defense from water barriers.

Aquatic: The army increases its MV, RV, and DV by 1 against armies in the water or on ships. The army decreases its MV and RV by 2 against armies on land (unless the army also has the amphibious special ability, in which case it doesn’t have this penalty).

Arc: The army’s attacks deal +1d4 points of damage

Armor Savant: The Army gains a +1 bonus to DV

Artificial Intelligence (Mechanic 1): The army’s effective ACR for the purpose of determining hit points increases by 1. This increase further increases by 1 for every 4 additional mechanic levels the army possesses.

Attach: The army’s units latch onto their opponents, making it difficult to escape. The target army takes a –2 penalty on Morale checks to resist a rout or use the withdraw tactic.

Aura (This includes any aura which causes a penalty): Any army the army is engaged with takes a -1 penalty of MV, RV, and DV.

Blast: The army can make ranged attacks. In the Ranged and Melee phases, it deals +1d4 points of damage. In addition, it adds one additional type of damage to the types that it can deal, which must match the damage type of the blast weapon.

Bleed: When this army deals damage in melee, the target army takes an automatic 1d6 points of damage at the start of the next Phase.

Blindsense: The army reduces its MV, RV, and DV penalties by half from visibility.

Blindsight: The army takes no penalties to its MV, RV, and DV from visibility.

Block: The army’s DV increases by 1.

Boost: Once per battle, the army can gain a +2 bonus to MV and RV for 1 Turn.

Breath Weapon: This ability functions as blast.

Burn: This ability functions as bleed.

Burrow: The army can dig under a fortification by spending a Ranged or Melee Phase moving. In later phases, it ignores any bonuses to defense granted by a Colony. During the Phase the army uses burrow, it can attack or be attacked only by armies using burrow or earth glide.

Cheek Pouches: The cost of equipping the army is reduced by 1 BP.

Climb: The army treats the Defense modifier of Infrastructure as 25% lower than normal when attacking.

Communalism: The army’s MV, RV, and DV increases by 1.

Compression: The army gains a +1 bonus to DV and to Morale checks made to withdraw.

Connection Power (Mystic 1): The army can either deal +1d4 points of damage against another army or take an MV and RV penalty equal to half its ACR for one Ranged or Melee Phase to heals a number of hit points equal to its ACR. For every 4 mystic levels beyond the first, this healing and damage increases by 1.

Constructed: The army gains a +2 bonus to DV.

Construct Immunities: The army is immune to disease, fear, paralysis, and poison.

Create Darkness: Once per battle, the army can reduce vision on the battlefield by one step (bright light to normal light, normal light to dim light, or dim light to darkness).

Damage Reduction: See significant defense.

Darkvision: The army takes no MV, RV, or DV penalties in dim light or darkness.

Disease: If the army damages an enemy, the enemy becomes diseased and takes a cumulative –1 penalty to its MV, RV, and DV each Moment after the battle. Curing the disease requires a successful Stability check modified by this penalty and allows the army to reduce this penalty by 1 each Moment thereafter until the penalty is gone.

Earth Glide: The army treats the Defense modifier of Infrastructure as 50% lower than normal when attacking and can burrow under other fortifications as if using the burrow special ability.

Elemental Immunities: This ability functions as amorphous.

Energy Drain: If the army damages an enemy, it reduces the enemy’s MV, RV, and DV by 1 for 24 hours.

Envoy Improvisation (Envoy 1): The army increases its MV and DV by 1 and gains a +2 bonus on Morale checks against fear and routs. These bonuses increase by +1 for every 4 additional envoy levels members of the army have. Alternatively, these bonuses may be divided up between allied armies however the army wishes.

Explode: This ability functions as blast.

Fast Healing: Each Ranged or Melee Phase, this army regains a number of hit points equal to its fast healing value. Outside of battle, each hour the army regains a number of hit points equal to twice its fast healing value.

Fear Immunity: The army never fails Morale checks but must always use standard tactics and strategy.

Fearless: Reduce one morale penalty the army would take by 1.

Ferocity: The army continues to fight even if demoralized or nearly dead. If the army is defeated or routed, it may continue to act for one more Melee Phase, and its MV and DV are reduced by 4 for that Phase.

Flight: If the army doesn’t attack in the Melee Phase, it can’t be attacked with melee attacks except by another army with flight. The army treats the Defense modifier of Infrastructure as 75% lower than normal when attacking.

Four-Armed or Six-Armed: The army gains a +1 bonus to MV and RV.

Frightful Presence: If the army damages an enemy army, that army must attempt a Morale check (DC = 10 + your army’s ACR). Failure means the enemy army is afraid and can’t attempt an Offense check to attack during the next Phase. If an army fails a Morale check during a Phase in which it is already afraid, it routs.

Grab: This ability functions as Attach.

Gear Boost (Soldier 3): Increase the army’s MV and RV by 1. This bonus increases by 1 for every 4 additional soldier levels members of the army have.

Hardness: See significant defenses.

Immunity: See significant defenses.

Incorporeal: The army’s MV, RV, and DV increase by 2, and it automatically succeeds at checks to withdraw. It has a mobility advantage in all kinds of terrain.

Invisibility: Any army attacking this army takes a –2 penalty to its MV or RV for that attack. Any army attacked by this army takes a –2 penalty to its DV against its attacks. Armies that can’t see invisible creatures can’t prevent this army from withdrawing.

Knockdown: Any army the army is engaged with takes a -1 penalty to MV, and RV.

Light Blindness: The army decreases its MV and RV by 2 in bright light.

Light Sensitivity: The army decreases its MV and RV by 1 in bright light.

Low-Light Vision: The army takes no penalties for dim light.

Magic Hack (Technomancer 2): Once per battle, increase the army’s MV, RV, and DV by 2 for one round. For every 3 additional technomancer levels, increase this bonus by 1.

Mindless: See Fear Immunity.

Mobility Advantage: If the units have a form of mobility that gives them an advantage in the battlefield’s terrain (such as kasatha in a desert), increase the army’s MV and RV by 1 for that battle against armies without such mobility.

No Breath: The army takes no penalties for abnormal atmosphere.

Ooze Immunities: This ability functions as Construct Immunities.

Overload (Mechanic 3): The army can cause an army it is engaged with to take a -2 penalty on MV and DV for one Turn. This penalty increases by 1 for every 4 additional mechanic levels the army possesses.

Override (Mechanic 9): The penalty from Overload also applies to the army’s DV.

Plant Immunities: The army is immune to fear, paralysis, and poison.

Plantlike: This ability functions as constructed.

Paralysis (or ability that causes paralysis): Each time the army damages an enemy army, reduce the enemy army’s DV by 1.

Petrification: This ability functions as paralysis.

Poison: This ability functions as bleed.

Quick Movement (Operative 3): The army’s movement increases by 1, plus an additional 1 for every 4 additional operative levels the army possesses.

Regeneration: This ability functions as fast healing, using the creature’s regeneration in place of its fast healing.

Resistance: See significant defense.

See in Darkness: This ability functions as darkvision.

Self-Destruct: Whenever an army attacks this army in melee (including as part of friendly fire), the attacking army takes damage equal to half this army’s ACR.

Sense Through: The army gains a +1 bonus to MV and RV.

Sightless: The army gains a +1 bonus to MV, RV, DV against armies with spellcasting.

Significant Defense: The army has a significant defense such as powerful damage reduction or numerous immunities and/or resistances. Increase its DV by the value of its DR or Energy Resistance (to a maximum of 10, or 10 in the case of immunity), but only against armies that can’t overcome those defenses. In some cases, the GM might rule that an army is simply undefeatable by an enemy army because of its defenses (although the GM should never pit the PCs against such an army unless the PCs initiate a foolish battle).

Solar Manifestation (Solarian 1): Increase either the army’s MV, RV, or DV by 1. This increases by 1 for every four additional solarian levels the army has. A different stat can be increased each time one would be increased. In addition, the army’s attacks are considered magic for the purpose of overcoming DR.

Spell Resistance: The army increases its DV by 6 against armies with the spellcasting ability.

Spellcasting: The army’s MV and RV or their DV increases by an amount equal to the highest-level spell a member of the army is capable of casting, and their attacks are considered magic.

Stagger: This ability functions as paralysis.

Stellar Revelation (Solarian 2): Each time the army damages an enemy army, reduce the enemy army’s DV by 1. This reduction increases by 1 for every 4 additional solarian levels the army possesses.

Style Technique (Soldier 1): Increase the army’s movement, DV, or ACR for the purpose of determining hit points by 1. This increases by 1 for every four additional soldier levels the army has. A different stat can be increased each time one would be increased.

Summon Allies: The army’s MV, RV, and ACR for the purpose of determining HP increase by 1.

Swallow Whole: this ability functions as paralysis

Swarm: This ability functions as incorporeal.

Swarm Mind: As Communalism.

Swim: Any penalties from fighting on water or underwater are reduced by 1.

Telepathy or Limited Telepathy: The army gains a +2 bonus on Morale checks

Tracking: The army adds its ACR to Morale checks to prevent an army from using the withdraw tactic and to its DV to prevent ambushes.

Trample: The army gains a +1 bonus to MV.

Trick Attack (Operative 1): The army increases its MV and RV by 1 when making an ambush, when using the expert flankers tactic, when advancing on another army, or on the Phase after using the false retreat tactic. This increases by 1 for every 4 additional operative levels.

Uncanny Agility (Operative 7): Any penalties you take to DV are reduced by 1, to a minimum of 0. This reduction increases by 1 for every 4 additional operative levels.

Undead Immunities: this ability functions as construct immunities.

Unflankable: this ability functions as uncanny agility.

Vortex: this ability functions as paralysis.

Vulnerability: Against attacks it is vulnerable to, the army’s DV decreases by 2.

Water Breathing: Any penalties from fighting on water or underwater are reduced by 1.

Whirlwind: This ability functions as paralysis.

Wound: This ability functions as bleed.

Armies In The Field

Every army has a base Speed, which indicates how many Sectors it can cross in a Moment of typical marching. If several armies are moving together, they must travel at the speed of the slowest army or else separate into faster and slower-moving groups.

Extended Travel: An army can be forced to deplete its resources to move more quickly, allowing it to move 1 additional Sector beyond its normal movement. However, an army is automatically fatigued for 1 Moment after extended travel. An army that uses extended travel again when already fatigued becomes exhausted and takes 1d4 points of damage.

Living Off the Land: Armies can draw from the resources around them in many cases to reduce Consumption. Any army can attempt to supply itself by foraging and hunting, reducing its Consumption by half for one Turn. This requires a Morale check with a DC equal to the size of the largest army reducing Consumption in this way + the total number of armies reducing Consumption using this method in the Sector. Each time an army attempts to live off the land in the same Sector, the DC increases by 1. Once a check is failed, that Sector is exhausted in terms of available resources. Armies can choose to commandeer resources from people living in the Sector, or simply rob them and pillage their supplies. This adds a bonus of +1d6 to the Morale check, +2d6 in a Sector with a Colony, but each Sector you pillage results in -1 Loyalty and +1 Infamy.

Supply Train: Most armies travel with supply trains to take care of ordinary physical needs of the troops and to transport their material. Any army that is more than 4 Sectors from your nearest Colony must have a supply train traveling with it to keep it supplied (this is in addition to the increased costs from Supply Lines). Each army has a supply train, which is an army one size smaller than it composed of CR 1/2 creatures. These armies are typically noncombatant, remaining in the Camp Zone, but at the GM’s discretion may be forced into combat by a relentless opponent or may be captured or killed by a victorious enemy. Armies in the supply train do not count against an Empire’s command limit, but supply train armies lost in battle do stack with soldiers lost in terms of affecting their Empire’s Economy, Loyalty, and Stability, as described in Victory and Aftermath, and they must be dealt with as prisoners of war if captured after a battle.

Camouflage, Scouting, and Ambushes

In most cases, armies travel in the open, with little effort at stealth. As a result, detection of enemy armies is considered to be automatic for any enemy armies that are in the same Sector. However, armies can take various measures to hide their presence, and by moving at half speed they can remain largely out of sight. Note that if an army would already be moving at only 1 Sector per Moment, it must use extended travel (see below) to continue moving at 1 Sector per Moment while using camouflage. To notice another moving army that is using camouflage, an army rolls 1d20 and adds its Scouting modifier against a DC equal to the enemy army’s Camouflage score, which is equal to 10 plus the Stealth modifier of the creatures comprising the Sector, adding the commander’s AB bonus and applying the Camouflage modifier noted in Table: Army Size. When two armies enter adjacent Sectors, each makes a Scouting check with a -5 penalty. If both succeed, both are aware of the other. If neither succeeds, neither is aware of the other, and the two armies may continue moving and could blunder into one another. If one army succeeds and the other fails, it can set an ambush for the other, lying in wait until the enemy army moves into its Sector.

When one army is aware of another but has not been noticed itself, it is in position for an ambush. An army waiting in ambush gains a +5 bonus to its Camouflage score against an army that has already failed once to notice it. If the enemy army enters its square, it can trigger the ambush, allowing it to make a melee or ranged attack (their choice) against the enemy army.

For the duration of the ambush, the attacker gains the benefit of the Advanced Tactics command boon (gaining an additional +2 bonus to MV and RV if it already has that boon) for the duration of the ambush.

There is a 50% chance that high ground (see Terrain) is present at the ambush site; if so, the ambusher can occupy the high ground before the ambush begins.

This initial attack is followed by a Rout Phase, and if the army being ambushed survives and does not rout, the battle proceeds to the Tactics Phase and initiative is rolled normally. If the army it wishes to ambush fails to enter its Sector, the ambushing army can hold its position and wait for the enemy army to spring the Table 8-5: Battlefield Terrain trap, or it can move to an adjacent Sector and reset the ambush. Having to shift its position makes it easier to be discovered, and an ambushing army gains only a +2 bonus to Camouflage if it has to move.

Battlefield Terrain

In warfare, the Topography and terrain of a battle can have a huge impact. The standard rules assume a fairly even playing field for both armies and little in the way of impeding terrain. The following rules (and Table: Battlefield) describe how to adapt a battlefield for greater variety.

Barriers: Some barriers, which may be anything from cliffs to ravines to seas to force fields, obstruct the movement of armies. These do not prevent ranged attacks, but both prevent movement or melee attack across the barrier unless it is circumvented in some way.

Table 8-5: Battlefield Terrain
Battlefield Melee Ranged DV Scout Movement
Barrier Impossible       Impossible*
Dangerous       -1 -1
High Ground (Holding) +1 +1   +1 +1
High Ground (Attacking) -1       -1
Treacherous     -2 -1 -1

*Certain methods of enhanced movement, such as flight or swimming, may allow an army to move normally across the barrier.

Table 8-6: Battlefield Visibility
Visibility Melee Ranged DV Scout Movement
Bright Light +2
Normal Light
Dim Light -1 -2 -2 -1
Darkness -2 -4 -1 -4 -2
Light Smoke -1 -2 -2
Thick Smoke -2 -4 -4 -1
Table 8-7: Battlefield Topography
Topography Type Melee Ranged DV Scout Movement
Dunes -1 -2 -2 -1 -1
Hills +1
Ice -2 +1 -1
Mountains -1 -2 +1 -1
Flatland
Underground -1 -2 -2 -1
Underwater -2 -4 -2 -1
Void of Space +1 +2 -2 +2 +1
Wasteland +1
Water -1
Wetland -1 -2 -1 -1 -1
Table 8-8: Battlefield Biome
Biome Type Melee Ranged DV Scout Movement
Desolate +2 +1
Sparse +1
Baseline
Abundant -1 -2 -2 -1
Overflowing +2 +4 -4 -4
Table 8-9: Battlefield Atmosphere
Atmosphere Type Melee Ranged DV Scout Movement
Airless +2 -2
Thin +1 -1
Normal
Hostile -2 -1

Dangerous: This includes areas that are difficult to traverse for some reason or another. If being used tactically to target specific enemy armies, use the Magical Trickery command boon. If the entire battlefield is dangerous, then all armies (except those inside fortifications) take 1 point of damage at the beginning of every Rout Phase unless they have the Magical Protection command boon.

High Ground: Even in advanced settings, claiming the high ground can be enough of an advantage to render a fight over in the minds of combatants. Typical 84 battlefields are relatively even when it comes to Topography, but if the GM wishes the general winning Tactical Initiative during the first Battle Phase of a battle may claim the high ground, placing one army atop that slope. It enjoys the bonuses listed above, while armies trying to attack it have the listed penalties. The army forfeits the benefits of the high ground if it is forced to leave the battlefield or if it leaves its position to use any of the following Tactics: Furious Charge, Overwhelming Onslaught, Pincer Maneuver, Pursuit. If an army vacates the high ground, other armies can try to claim it, though an engaged army must try to disengage in order to do so. If more than one army tries to claim the high ground, the two armies must fight; each of them takes the penalties for attacking the high ground and neither gains the bonuses of holding the high ground.

If one army succeeds in its attack and the other does not, the successful army claims the high ground after both attacks are resolved. Generally speaking, if a fortification (including a Colony) is present on the battlefield, that fortification will always be built upon the high ground unless otherwise noted. At the GM’s option, spells like terraform could be used to reshape the battlefield and alter the position of the high ground.

Treacherous: This includes storm-whipped snow or rain, deep bogs, shifting sand, fast-moving water, or other terrains which would make it hard for troops to move properly. This terrain rarely offers much in the way of cover, and footing in this terrain is very unstable.

Visibility

In warfare, simply identifying friend from foe is not always easy, and this is especially true when some creatures have perceptual abilities far beyond those available in the real world. Creatures able to see in the dark have a great advantage in battles at night, while those sensitive to bright light avoid fighting by day if they can. Weather effects are described in the subsequent section, but the table below describes the effect of various illumination levels on general combat effectiveness on offense and defense, as well as the ability of armies to spot one another or even to move effectively. Creatures able to see normally in darkness take no penalties for fighting in it, while those sensitive to bright light take penalties in such conditions. Otherwise, all creatures present in a battle take the same penalties from poor visibility unless they have some special means of negating them. The Movement modifier below can never reduce an army’s movement below 1.

Fog of War: Whenever an army takes a penalty to its MV or RV due to poor visibility, its chance of shooting awry increases. When attacking an army that is engaged with an allied army during the Gunnery Phase, the chance of dealing friendly fire damage (see Gunnery Phase) is increased to 50%.

In addition, even attacks during the Melee Phase against an army engaged with an ally have a 25% of dealing damage as friendly fire to your allied army.

Terrain: Terrain also can play a major role in a battle, and although most armies are equipped to deal with basic impediments the extremes of space can offer threats difficult to prepare for. Each type of Topography, Biome, and Atmosphere confers its own effects on mass combat.

If ever they are fighting with more than a -8 penalty to any type of check because of Visibility and Terrain effects, armies must make a Morale check at the end of each Rout Phase to avoid becoming fatigued.

Cosmic Conflict without an Empire

There are times when players may wish to lead an army without controlling an entire Empire, which may cause issues given how deeply intertwined the two rulesets are. If you aren’t running an Empire but would still like to use these mass combat rules as part of your regular Starfinder game, substitute a diplomacy skill check for a Loyalty check when one is required. Instead of an Empire’s Control DC, use a DC equal to 10 + 1-1/2 the party’s average level. Instead of an Empire Turn, use 1 month. Instead of using build points (BP) to represent the cost of equipping and maintaining an army, multiply the BP cost by 1000 CP.

Sample Armies

The following are a few armies which players can match themselves against or possibly hire, comprising a variety of scales and levels.

Android Strike Force ACR 10

LN Army of Android Operatives (CR 8)
Size: 4; Divisions: 4 (10 HP per division)
HP: 40; DV: 27
MV: +14; RV: +15 (kinetic, electricity, or sonic)
Morale Bonus: 5
Movement: 5
Tactics: Covering Fire, Dirty Fighters, False Retreat, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Feint, Pursuit, Retreat, Siegebreaker, Skirmishers, Sniper Support, Spellbreaker, Standard, Strafing Skirmishers, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Constructed, Darkvision, Low-light vision, Trick Attack, Uncanny Agility, Quick Movement Camouflage: 30; Scouting: +15
Consumption: 5
Commander: Sienna G-37 (ACR 2, Cha +1, 10 ranks, Leadership 12)
Command Boons: Ready for Battle, Sharpshooter, Surgical Strike; Equipment: Tier 2 Ranged Weaponry, Tier 2 Light Armor, Tier 1 Melee Weaponry, Aces x2, Specialized Weapon x2

Shiramaga, Old Blue Dragon ACR 15

NE Army of 1 Old Blue Dragon (CR 17)
Size: 1; Divisions: 1
HP: 15; DV: 28
MV: +25; RV: +25 (kinetic or electricity)
Morale Bonus: 7
Movement: 2
Tactics: Cautious Combat, Dirty Fighters, False Retreat, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Overwhelming Onslaught, Pursuit, Relentless Brutality, Retreat, Siegebreaker, Skirmishers, Standard, Strafing Skirmishers, Taunt, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Blindsense, Breath Weapon, Burrow, Darkvision, Flight, Frightful Presence, Significant Defenses (10 kinetic nonmagical, 10 electricity), Spellcasting (6)
Camouflage: 37; Scouting: +29
Consumption: 8
Commander: Shiramaga (AB 3, Cha +5, 17 ranks, Leadership 22)
Command Boons: Daring Maneuvers, Magical Advantage, Magical Protection, Magical Trickery; Equipment: none

Human Empire Legion ACR 9

LE Army of Human Soldiers (CR 3)
Size: 6; Divisions: 6 (9 hp per division)
HP: 54; DV: 22
MV: +12; RV: +13 (fire)
Morale Bonus: 5
Movement: 1
Tactics: Covering Fire, Defensive Wall, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Hunker Down, Overwhelming Onslaught, Pursuit, Relentless Brutality, Retreat, Screening Defense, Siegebreaker, Standard, Strafing Skirmishers, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Style Technique (Morale), Gear Boost, Unflankable 86
Camouflage: 14; Scouting: +6
Consumption: 5
Commander: Crystallia Whilmaris (AB 1, Cha +3, 5 ranks, Leadership 8)
Command Boons: Flexible Tactics, Merciless; Equipment: Tier 1 ranged weaponry, tier 1 heavy armor, tier 1 medical supplies

Human Empire Elite Squad ACR 12

LE Army of Human Soldiers (CR 10)
Size: 4; Divisions: 4 (14 hp per division)
HP: 56; DV: 31
MV: +22; RV: +20 (kinetic or sonic)
Morale Bonus: 8
Movement: 1
Tactics: Cautious Combat, Covering Fire, Defensive Wall, Driving Strike, Feint, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Hunker Down, Overwhelming Onslaught, Pincer Maneuver, Pursuit, Relentless Brutality, Retreat, Siegebreaker, Sniper Support, Standard, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Gear Boost, Style Technique, Ferocity, Stagger Camouflage: 26; Scouting: +14
Consumption: 6
Commander: Erdrick Valtea (AB 3, Cha +4, 15 ranks, Leadership 19)
Command Boons: Bloodied but Unbroken, Death Before Dishonor, Implacable Advance, Last Stand; Equipment: Tier 3 Melee Weaponry, Tier 2 Ranged Weaponry, Tier 2 Heavy Armor, Tier 1 Transports, Tier 1 Mobile Fortifications, Specialized Weapons x2, Tier 2 Medical Supplies

Human Empire Star Cavalry ACR 7

LN Army of Human Solarians (CR 7)
Size: 3; Divisions: 3 (7 hp per divisions)
HP: 21; DV: 22
MV: +13; RV: +12 (kinetic or fire)
Morale Bonus: 9
Movement: 4
Tactics: Dirty Fighters, Driving Strike, Driving Sweep, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Pincer Maneuver, Pursuit, Retreat, Siegebreaker, Skirmishers, Standard, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Solar Manifestation, Stellar Revelation, Burn, Flight Camouflage: 23; Scouting: +12
Consumption: 4
Commander: Sabat Onnorius (AB 2, Cha +5, 10 ranks, Leadership 15)
Command Boons: Loyalty, Daring Maneuvers, Hit and Run; Equipment: Tier 2 Transports, Tier 2 Light Armor, Tier 1 Ranged Weaponry, Specialized Weapons, Mobility Enhancement (flight), Boon

Human Empire Spellcaster Division ACR 8

NE Army of Human Technomancers (CR 8)
Size: 3; Divisions: 3 (8 HP per division)
HP: 24; DV: 24
MV: +14; RV: +11 (electricity)
Morale Bonus: 7
Movement: 2
Tactics: Covering Fire, Defensive Wall, Dirty Fighters, Feint, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Retreat, Screening Defense, Sniper Support, Spellbreaker, Standard, Strafing Skirmishers, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Spellcasting, Magic Hack, Invisibility, Earth Glide Camouflage: 24; Scouting: +11
Consumption: 4
Commander: Vega Barnhas (AB 2, Cha +2, 11 ranks, Leadership 16)
Command Boons: Magical Barrage, Magical Protection, Advanced Tactics; Equipment: Tier 1 Melee Weaponry, Tier 2 Ranged Weaponry, Tier 2 Light Armor, Mobility Enhancement (earth glide), Tier 2 Mobile Fortifications, Ace x2

Kasatha Raiding Party ACR 5

CN Army of Kasatha Operatives (CR 7)
Size: 2; Divisions: 1 (10 HP per division)
HP: 10; DV: 19
MV: +9; RV: +9 (kinetic)
Morale Bonus: +3
Movement: 3
Tactics: Feint, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Pincer Tactics, Pursuit, Retreat, Skirmishers Standard, Strafing Skirmishers, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Four-Armed, Trick Attack, Quick Movement, Mobility Advantage (desert), Uncanny Agility Camouflage: 27; Scouting: +13
Consumption: 3
Commander: Siblis Wratikeen (AB 1, Cha +2, 8 ranks, Leadership 10)
Command Boons: Swift Pursuit, Sharpshooter; Equipment: Tier 1 Ranged Weapons, Tier 1 Melee Weapons, Tier 1 Light Armor

Kasatha Raiding Convoy ACR 13

CE Army of Kasatha Mechanics (CR 7)
Size: 6; Divisions: 6 (15 hp per division)
HP: 90; DV: 27
MV: +20; RV: +19 (kinetic or acid)
Morale Bonus: 8
Movement: 4
Tactics: Covering Fire, Dirty Fighters, Driving Strike, Driving Sweep, Fast Repair, Full Defense, Fales Retreat, Feint, Furious Charge, Overwhelming Onslaught, Pincer Maneuver, Pursuit, Retreat, Skirmishers, Spellbreaker, Standard, Taunt, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Four-Armed, Mobility Advantage (desert), artificial intelligence, overload Camouflage: 25; Scouting: +10
Consumption: 7
Commander: Illoric Jorgoth (AB 2, Cha +4, 11 ranks, Leadership 18)
Command Boons: Hit and Run, Ready for Battle, Surgical Strike; Equipment: Tier 2 Melee Weaponry, Tier 1 Ranged Weaponry, Specialized Weaponry, Tier 2 Transport, Tier 2 Light Armor, Tier 1 Siege Weaponry, Tier 1 Medical Supplies

Orc Phrenic Rampage ACR 20

CE Army of Orc Mystics (CR 5)
Size: 10; Divisions: 15 (20 hp per divisions)
HP: 300; DV: 30
MV: +25; RV: +24 (kinetic)
Morale Bonus: 10
Movement: 3
Tactics: Driving Strike, Driving Sweep, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Overwhelming Onslaught, Pursuit, Relentless Brutality, Retreat, Siegebreaker, Standard, Taunt, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Spellcasting, Connection Power, Darkvision, Ferocity Camouflage: 12; Scouting: +14
Consumption: 10
Commander: Eldest Klurg (AB 2, Cha +3, 11 ranks, Leadership 15)
Command Boons: Implacable Advance, Magical Advantage, Screaming for Vengeance; Equipment: Tier 1 Melee Weaponry, Tier 1 Transport

Robotic Battalion ACR 10

N Army of Robot Soldiers (CR 2)
Size: 7; Divisions: 8 (2 HP per division)
HP: 16; DV: 28
MV: +18; RV: +19 (electricity, kinetic, or sonic)
Morale Bonus: 2
Movement: 1
Tactics: Cautious Combat, Covering Fire, Defensive Wall, False Retreat, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Hunker Down, Pincer Maneuver, Retreat, Screening Defense, Siegebreaker, Sniper Support, Spellbreaker, Standard, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Style Technique, Construct Immunities, Significant Defense (8 hardness), Darkvision, Blindsense, Arc
Camouflage: 12; Scouting: +7
Consumption: 5
Commander: 32-B (AB 3, Cha +1, 13 ranks, Leadership 14)
Command Boons: Sharpshooter, Skywardens, Implacable Advance; Equipment: Tier 3 Heavy Armor, Tier 3 Melee Weaponry, Tier 3 Ranged Weaponry, Boon, Specialized Weaponry x3, Tier 2 Siege Weaponry

Robotic Mobile Artillery ACR 10

N Army of Robot Technomancers (CR 8)
Size: 4; Divisions: 4 (10 HP per division)
HP: 40; DV: 26
MV: +17; RV: +19 (fire)
Morale Bonus: 3
Movement: 3
Tactics: Covering Fire, Dirty Fighters, Driving Strike, Driving Sweep, False Retreat, Feint, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Pursuit, Retreat, Screening Defense, Skirmishers, Standard, Strafing Skirmishers, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Spellcasting, Magic Hack, Construct Immunities, Significant Defense (10 hardness), Darkvision, Blindsense Camouflage: 27; Scouting: +13
Consumption: 5 Camouflage: 20; Scouting: +14
Commander: T-47 the Pure (AB 3, Cha +0, 12 ranks, Leadership 17)
Command Boons: Magical Advantage, Magical Barrage, Magical Trickery, Hit and Run; Equipment: Tier 2 Ranged Weapons, Tier 2 Mobile Fortifications, Tier 1 Transports

Shirren Mentalist Artillery ACR 11

LG Army of Shirren Mystics (CR 7)
Size: 5; Divisions: 5 (11 HP per division)
HP: 55; DV: 28
MV: +12; RV: +13
Morale Bonus: 6
Movement: 2
Tactics: Cautious Combat, Covering Fire, Defensive Wall, False Retreat, Feint, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Hunker Down, Retreat, Screening Defense, Sniper Support, Spellbreaker, Standard, Strafing Skirmishers, Taunt, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Limited Telepathy, Communalism, Blindsense, Spellcasting, Connection Power Consumption: 6
Commander: D’ja V’plas (AB 2, Cha +1, 12 ranks, Leadership 16)
Command Boons: Magical Favor, Magical Healing, Magical Protection; Equipment: Tier 2 Mobile Fortifications, Tier 2 Ranged Weaponry, Tier 2 Light Armor, Tier 1 Melee Weaponry, Ace x3

Shirren Guide Force ACR 3

NG Army of Shirren Envoys (CR 3)
Size: 3; Divisions: 3 (3 HP per division)
HP: 9; DV: 16
MV: 16; RV: 17 (cold)
Morale Bonus: 9
Movement: 2
Tactics: Full Defense, Furious Charge, Hunker Down, Retreat, Screening Defense, Standard, Taunt, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Limited Telepathy, Communalism, Blindsense, Envoy Improvisation 89
Camouflage: 20; Scouting: +7
Consumption: 2
Commander: Zuet Ss’riet (AB 1, Cha +4, 6 ranks, Leadership 10)
Command Boons: Loyalty, Triage; Equipment: Tier 1 Ranged Weaponry, Tier 1 Light Armor, Ace x2, Tier 1 Medical Supplies x2

Swarm Horde ACR 22

CE Army of Swarm Thresher Lords (CR 10)
Size: 9; Divisions: 12 (22 HP per division)
HP: 264; DV: 32
MV: +27; RV: +27
Morale Bonus: 9
Movement: 2
Tactics: Cautious Combat, Dirty Fighters, False Retreat, Feint, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Hunker Down, Overwhelming Onslaught, Pincer Maneuver, Pursuit, Relentless Brutality, Retreat, Siegebreaker, Skirmishers, Spellbreaker, Standard, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Significant Defenses (10 Acid), Telepathy, Swarm Mind, Bleed, Fear Immunity Camouflage: 27; Scouting: +18
Consumption: 11
Commander: The Arch Screamer (AB 4, Cha -2, 16 ranks, Leadership 14)
Command Boons: Ready for Battle, Merciless, Advanced Tactics, Hit and Run, Implacable Advance; Equipment: None

Vesk War Platoon ACR 18

LE Army of Vesk Soldiers (CR 12)
Size: 6; Divisions: 6 (21 HP per division)
HP: 90; DV: 39
MV: +32; RV: +33 (kinetic and fire)
Morale Bonus: 8
Movement: 2
Tactics: Cautious Combat, Covering Fire, Defensive Wall, Driving Strike, Driving Sweep, False Retreat, Feint, Full Defense, Furious Charge, Hunker Down, Overwhelming Onslaught, Pincer Maneuver, Pursuit, Relentless Brutality, Retreat, Screening Defense, Siegebreaker, Skirmishers, Sniper Support, Spellbreaker, Standard, Strafing Skirmishers, Volley, Withdraw; Special Abilities: Fearless, Low-light vision, Armor Savant, Gear Boost, Style Technique Camouflage: 30; Scouting: +19
Consumption: 9
Commander: Morgolith Skurg (AB +4, Cha +5, 16 ranks, Leadership 21)
Command Boons: Sharpshooter, Surgical Strike, Ready for Battle, Master Recruiter, Loyalty; Equipment: Tier 3 Melee Weaponry, Tier 3 Ranged Weaponry, Tier 2 Mobile Fortifications, Tier 3 Heavy Armor, Tier 3 Siege Weaponry, Tier 2 Transports, Tier 2 Medical Supplies, Specialized Weaponry

Zombie Horde ACR 1

NE Army of Occult Zombies (CR 1)
Size: 3; Divisions: 3 (1 HP per division)
HP: 3; DV: 13
MV: +1; RV: +1 (kinetic)
Morale Bonus: 4
Movement: 2
Tactics: Standard; Special Abilities: Undead Immunities, Significant Defenses (5 kinetic nonmagical), Mindless, Darkness Camouflage: 19; Scouting: +1
Consumption: 1
Commander: None (AB 0, Cha +1, 0 ranks, Leadership 1)
Command Boons: Wolves in the Fold; Equipment: None

Zombie Armored Platoon ACR 9

NE Army of Cybernetic Zombies (CR 3)
Size: 6; Divisions: 6 (9 HP per division)
HP: 54; DV: 23
MV: +12; RV: +12 (kinetic, cold, acid)
Morale Bonus: 6
Movement: 1
Tactics: Standard; Special Abilities: Undead Immunities, Mindless, Vulnerable (Electricity), Darkness, Self-destruct Camouflage: 17; Scouting: +5
Consumption: 5
Commander: Dark Servitor Urloc (AB 1, Cha +3, 7 ranks, Leadership 12)
Command Boons: Magical Healing, Last Stand; Equipment: Tier 1 Melee Weaponry, Tier 1 Ranged Weaponry, Tier 1 Heavy Armor, Tier 1 Mobile Fortifications, Specialized Weapons x2, Boon 90